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In-Box Review
135
Stabile Engine
Stabile Engine
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by: Darren Baker [ CMOT ]

Introduction

Plus Model the Czech manufacturer of resin goodness has sent Armorama some offerings for review. On this occasion one of the offering is a Stabile engine (Stable Engine in English) made entirely from resin and photo etch and supplied in 1/35th scale. This power source would have made an appearance around 1930ís and used just as the steam engines that were still around at the time. These machines were used to power farm machinery for some time and I am led to believe up to the 1960ís.

Review

This offering from Plus Model is supplied in a card box with a good quality print on it covering the product. Inside there is a bubble wrap pocket with a second sealed plastic bag inside containing the resin parts for the item. This approach is reasonable and has prevented damage in this case to the resin but the photo etch is distorted; Due to this I would urge Plus Model to consider going down the same route as the likes of ICM where packaging is concerned. Also loose inside the carton is a small piece of paper covering construction, an aspect I approve of regardless of the simplicity of the model.

This offering from Plus Model is again a nice rustic offering that has the possibility to add interest to a rural scene across Europe and North America. This offering consists mostly of resin elements, but also has photo etch, wire and decals used to complete the model. All of the castings are well done with so far as I can see only flash to contend with which is normal for resin products. Some twist damage has occurred to the photo etch which is a weakness in the packaging chosen by Plus Model in my opinion. Lastly I would like to thank Plus Model for taking the time to provide an instruction sheet in the package.

This is a horse drawn cart made of mostly cast iron. The engine is in the box at the end where the handle is and then a belt drives a cog at the other end which powers the flywheel that would have another belt to operate a piece of machinery. The small tank at the top is a gravity fed fuel tank for the engine. The chassis of this vehicle is basic and made of angle iron with all of the needed parts bolted to it. The tower with the flywheels is I believe a basic gear box, but information on this piece of kit is hard to find. I thought the engine was on top of the tower but then the box makes no sense.

The instructions do a good job of steering you through the construction of this model, and apart from cleaning up the earlier mentioned flash it only requires care when removing the casting plugs. I will say that 10 minutes spent cleaning up and sanding the parts will save you hours in construction. This really is a well tackled model as regards detail and I found the real one in the Czech Agricultural Museum, unfortunately no information was available that I could find. Leave off the decals and I see no reason for it not being used in many settings across Europe.

Conclusion

This offering from Plus Model is an unusual one when it comes to finding information on it, I will be surprised if many people looking at it will be able to tell you much beyond what it was obviously used for. If a Czech person takes a look that has been to the Museum in Prague they may be able to provide more details. The parts are in good order with the exception of the twist/bend in the photo etch and so should not cause much in the way of issues. I am not going to say this specific one was used across Europe but similar would have been and so this can be used in my opinion.
SUMMARY
Darren Baker takes a look at a 1/35th scale Plus Model offering in the form of a Stabile Engine (Stable Engine in English)
  Scale: 1:35
  Mfg. ID: 505
  PUBLISHED: Jul 25, 2019
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 87.04%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 85.57%

Our Thanks to Plus Model!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

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About Darren Baker (CMOT)
FROM: ENGLAND - SOUTH WEST, UNITED KINGDOM

I have been building model kits since the early 70ís starting with Airfix kits of mostly aircraft, then progressing to the point I am at now building predominantly armour kits from all countries and time periods. Living in the middle of Salisbury plain since the 70ís, I have had lots of opportunitie...

Copyright ©2019 text by Darren Baker [ CMOT ]. All rights reserved.



Comments

Interesting subject, but all of that flash clean up that will be required seems to be will take as much time as the build.
JUL 26, 2019 - 12:00 AM
Otherwise also known as a "Stationary Engine" in US jargon. (Though this little one is on wheels so it has the possibility of being not quite so stationary.)
JUL 26, 2019 - 12:37 AM
Would I be correct that this would be a straight swap out of Steam elements and insert combustion engine?
JUL 26, 2019 - 01:16 AM
Dennis I believe this engine is a kerosene/petrol/diesel engine rather than a steam engine.
JUL 26, 2019 - 05:12 PM
I know it is a combustion engine of some kind, but I want to know if this is the same set up as a steam engine type would have been?
JUL 26, 2019 - 09:25 PM
As you no doubt already know a similar steam driven engine would require an external source of steam or compressed air, severely limiting the portability of the engine. That indeed was the advantage of these small to medium sized petrol engines. Some were so small even as to be used to drive a home washing machine. Model wise, a small steam engine would look very similar to this hobby casting; (though mechanically quite different.) However the fuel tank and the water cooling arrangement seen on this model would have to be discarded. The steam engine could be mounted either vertically of horizontally on the cart or more likely on a fixed base.
JUL 26, 2019 - 10:23 PM
Steam Engines; Small vertical 2 cyl. steam engine. (Actually two separate engines simply bolted to a common shaft.): Somewhat larger 2 cyl. steam hoist engine: Larger still, single cylinder horizontal steam engine used to power a fair sized machine shop via overhead belts and shafts: All photos property of Michael Koenig - All rights Reserved. Source: Western Mining & Machinery Museum; Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA.
JUL 26, 2019 - 10:59 PM
Similar use petrol engines: Maytag washing machine motor: A somewhat more rustic washing machine arrangement: A very representative small water cooled petrol engine: Several somewhat larger petrol engines: Crossley Bros. Petrol Engine (Otto/Crossley Patent) Manchester: All photos property of Michael Koenig - All rights Reserved. Source: Upper photos; Assorted Kentucky Farm Machinery Shows. Bottom three photos; Toleman Machinery Museum; Lexington, Kentucky, USA.
JUL 26, 2019 - 11:19 PM
   

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