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In-Box Review
132
Browning M2 50 cal machine gun
I'd give a month's R&R in Bangkok for the smell of a 50!
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by: Stephen T. Lawson [ JACKFLASH ]


Originally published on:
AeroScale

History

A variant without a water jacket, but with a thicker-walled, air-cooled barrel superseded the M2 (air-cooled barrels had already been used on variants for use on aircraft, but these quickly overheated in ground use). The Browning M2 is an air-cooled, belt-fed machine gun. The M2 fires from a closed bolt, operated on the short recoil principle. The M2 fires the .50 BMG cartridge, which offers long range, accuracy and good stopping power. The .50 AN/M2 light-barrel aircraft Browning used in planes had a rate of fire of approximately 800 rounds per minute, and was used singly or in groups of up to eight guns for aircraft ranging from the P-47 Thunderbolt to the B-25 Mitchell bomber.

The M2 is a scaled-up version of John Browning's M1917 .30 caliber machine gun (even using the same timing gauges) There are several different types of ammunition used in the M2HB and AN aircraft guns. From World War II through the Vietnam War, the big Browning was used with standard ball, armor-piercing (AP), armor-piercing incendiary (API), and armor-piercing incendiary tracer (APIT) rounds. All .50 ammunition designated "armor-piercing" was required to completely perforate 0.875" (22.2 mm) of hardened steel armor plate at a distance of 100 yards (91 m), and 0.75" (19 mm) at 547 yards (500 m). The API and APIT rounds left a flash, report, and smoke on contact, useful in detecting strikes on enemy targets; they were primarily intended to incapacitate thin-skinned and lightly armored vehicles and aircraft, while igniting their fuel tanks..

Fixed-mounted primary armament in World War II-era U.S. aircraft such as the P-47 Thunderbolt, P-51 Mustang, and the Korean-era U.S. F-86 Sabre. Fixed or flexible-mounted defensive armament in World War II-era bombers such as the B-17 Flying Fortress, and B-24 Liberator.

The XM213/M213 was a modernization and adaptation of existing .50 caliber AN/M2s in inventory for use as a pintle mounted door gun on helicopters using the M59 armament subsystem.

The GAU-15/A, formerly identified as the XM218, is a lightweight member of the M2/M3 family. The GAU-16/A was an improved GAU-15/A with modified grip and sight assemblies for similar applications. Both of these weapons were used as a part of the A/A49E-11 armament subsystem (also known as the Defensive Armament System).

The GAU-18/A, is a lightweight variant of the M2/M3, and is used on the USAF's MH-53 Pave Low and HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopters. These weapons do not use the M2HB barrel, and are typically set up as left-hand feed, right-hand charging weapons, but on the HH-60 Pavehawks that use the EGMS (External Gun Mount System) the gun is isolated from the shooter by a recoil absorbing cradle and all weapons are set up as right hand charge but vary between left and right hand feed depending on what side of the aircraft it is on. A feed chute adapter is attached to the left or right hand feed pawl bracket allowing the weapon to receive ammunition through a feed chute system connected to externally mounted ammunition containers holding 600 rounds each. (info via Wikipedia).

Kit Contents

There are;
2 gun barrels
2 fretted gun jackets
1 small sheet of instructions.

Simply slipping the barrels into the fretted gun jackets gives you the best impression of the business end of the 50 cal. No matter what WWII or later aircraft you add these to, it improves the build greatly to see these bad boys protruding from a wing. The milled tubing totally eliminates unwanted seams.

When contacting manufacturers and publishers please mention you saw this review at AEROSCALE
SUMMARY
Highs: Simple design & easy construction. No unwanted seams.
Lows: More detailed reference to applicable aircraft.
Verdict: An easy and impressive way for your build to take on the scale look of the real deal.
  DESIGN & DETAILS:92%
  AMOUNT OF PIECES:88%
  INSTRUCTIONS:90%
Percentage Rating
90%
  Scale: 1:32
  Mfg. ID: #A32 017
  Suggested Retail: $15.37
  Related Link: 
  PUBLISHED: Mar 26, 2011
  NATIONALITY: United States
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 90.97%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 90.73%

Our Thanks to Aber!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

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About Stephen T. Lawson (JackFlash)
FROM: COLORADO, UNITED STATES

I was building Off topic jet age kits at the age of 7. I remember building my first WWI kit way back in 1964-5 at the age of 8-9. Hundreds of 1/72 scale Revell and Airfix kits later my eyes started to change and I wanted to do more detail. With the advent of DML / Dragon and Eduard I sold off my ...

Copyright 2019 text by Stephen T. Lawson [ JACKFLASH ]. All rights reserved.



Comments

Hmm...I wonder if you could use these as a replacement for a 1/25 .30 Cal barrel for armoured projects?
MAR 26, 2011 - 12:02 PM
   

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