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Originally published on:
AeroScale

Auster AOP

history
The Auster AOP.9 was designed as a successor to the Auster AOP.6. Like its predecessor, it was a braced high-wing single engined monoplane with a fixed tailwheel undercarriage. Although having the same general appearance, the AOP.9 was a new design, with larger wing area and a more powerful engine. The wing and tail were metal-skinned, but the fuselage and ailerons were fabric-covered. The fin and rudder assembly were more angular in the new aircraft with a noticeable dorsal fillet. A combination of the more powerful 180 hp (134 kW) Blackburn Cirrus Bombardier engine, larger wings and large flaps gave it an improved take-off and landing performance compared with the AOP.6. It could operate from ploughed fields and muddy surfaces using low pressure tyres and strengthened undercarriage.

The cabin held three seats, pilot and passenger side-by-side and the observer behind, facing either forwards or rearwards. The aircraft was also designed to be convertible into a two-seat light transport with an interchangeable rear floor. In this configuration the observer sat alongside the pilot.

The prototype WZ662 first flew 19 March 1954. Auster Aircraft allotted its model designation B5 to the AOP.9 design.

History adapted from Wikipedia.
wz721 and wj358
The Museum's two Austers represent the penultimate and ultimate developments of C.G. Taylor's light aircraft design.
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About Darren Baker (CMOT)
FROM: ENGLAND - SOUTH WEST, UNITED KINGDOM

I have been building model kits since the early 70ís starting with Airfix kits of mostly aircraft, then progressing to the point I am at now building predominantly armour kits from all countries and time periods. Living in the middle of Salisbury plain since the 70ís, I have had lots of opportunitie...