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Resicast - Ford Draisine 1916
AlanL
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Posted: Saturday, January 25, 2014 - 01:48 AM UTC
Hi folks,

Got around to adding a tractor number for the vehicle.



Cheers

Al
AlanL
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Posted: Monday, December 23, 2013 - 12:47 AM UTC
Some figures I might use with the tractor.



Cheers

Al
AlanL
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Posted: Sunday, December 15, 2013 - 06:02 AM UTC
HI Michael,

Thanks, I see what you mean. I have something similar in mind, but with the Ford T and an ambulance. I shall have to extend the track but that shouldn't be a problem!

It is a nice sharp picture as you say. Thanks again.

Hi Jeff,

Many thanks for dropping in. My Somme dio is nearing completion and once I clear some space both the Draisine and the 6" Howitzer and 18pdr will be getting some attention for the Great War Campaign.

Cheers

Al
PantherF
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Posted: Sunday, December 15, 2013 - 05:03 AM UTC
I've been watching this for a looong time and I am really impressed!



Jeff
velotrain
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Posted: Sunday, December 15, 2013 - 04:15 AM UTC
Al - I meant the earlier one where the limbers are across from the "train" and the lorries are much closer, and the tractor hasn't yet started moving. It looked perhaps like some guys at the back were trying to add a 4th wagon, but I'm guessing the driver felt he had a heavy enough load already.

Michael - Thanks for the info on the fender supports. I'm guessing #39 is a fairly recent arrival, as it still had its headlights, and they would actually be a negative at the front.
AlanL
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Posted: Saturday, December 14, 2013 - 11:38 PM UTC
Hi Darren,

Many thanks.

Hi Michael.

Thank you for identifying those. They are not in the original kit so I'll fashion something up to replicate them at some point. I noticed on the upturned wagon there are some support beans that could be added too, might be a bit late for me now but I'll see what can be done. Pity I missed that first time round, not that they would be seen unless you upturned a wagon.

Cheers

Al
165thspc
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Posted: Saturday, December 14, 2013 - 11:31 PM UTC
Those "rods" are fender supports. You would think they would have been cut off but apparently this vehicle can be easily converted back to a road truck if needed.
darreng
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Posted: Saturday, December 14, 2013 - 11:28 PM UTC
Looking good Alan. Love the additional details.
AlanL
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Posted: Saturday, December 14, 2013 - 10:54 PM UTC
Hi Charles,

Thanks for the additional photographs. This is the one I think your talking about, it shows the number more clearly. I don't know what the rods are for but I will add them anyway. I haven't done much on the kit for a while, as I've been busy on my Somme dio.




Added a little paint to the 3rd truck but no decision yet as to what it might carry.



The picture of the goods yard is excellent. I've found most of the others and quite a few at IWM. I have a setting in mind but it's still in the development stage lol.

There is a lot of modelling mileage in this area as well as WWI in general.

Cheers

Al
velotrain
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Posted: Saturday, December 14, 2013 - 06:48 PM UTC
Alan - I recently discovered a photo that looks like it was taken about a minute before the one you used to start off your build. I think it's also by far the sharpest of the series of three.





I've also found the data for the series of three:
"Battle of Langemarck: Artillery shells being transported to the guns by light railway. Limbers, cars, carts and a convoy of lorries are also seen going forward on the road behind Elverdinghe, 19th August 1917."

Elverdinghe (Belgium) was apparently a major supply point - check out this image of the WDLR goods yard there. Kind of sets things straight for those who might have thought these railways were a small-scale operation.





I've also discovered that there's a fair number of models available in 1:76, including a 6-car field workshop train (closed for travel) - you're on your own for the interiors, should you wish to model it stopped.





I found another shot of a draisine hauling a heavier wagon full of shells, with a bunch of soldiers pushing. "A lorry engine converted for use on a light railway is hauling shells to gun positions. St. Julien, 13 March 1918."





These three photos are in the Imperial War Museum collection.



I've just found what looks like a works photo of a tractor with the earlier brass radiator, along with this text, "The change from brass to black radiator was effected in the U.S.A. in August 1916 but at Manchester in the UK not until mid 1917. Obviously in all these situations old stock was used up first." What's not known is if any with the older radiator made it to France - I'm wondering if that's on the model only because it's shown in the original plans?





This last one is quite small and foggy, but it shows a tractor wearing an improvised winter windscreen, and is identified as being at Ypres.






Have you found out anything about those two rods that angle out from near the bottom corners of the radiator? You mentioned them at one point, but I see you haven't added them.

I like your rope handles on some of the stowage - you just don't seem ready to stop ;-)
AlanL
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Posted: Sunday, November 24, 2013 - 10:14 PM UTC
Hi folks,

Got a little more done yesterday evening,by completing the 3rd wagon.



Started to add some rope handles to some of the boxes



I might add some uprights to this 3rd wagon to make it a casualty/stretcher wagon.

Cheers

Al

165thspc
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Posted: Friday, October 18, 2013 - 03:59 AM UTC
Check out this page on my thread "Waiting for a New Steam Locomotive". Frenchy posted photos of both a Velopede and a Motor Car each with those types of wheels.

http://www.armorama.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=208814
165thspc
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Posted: Friday, October 18, 2013 - 03:45 AM UTC
[quote]
Quoted Text




Lastly, and somewhat OT, I couldn’t resist this image of a shy but happy Swedish boy out for a Sunday spin with his dad in this 1937 scene – no doubt the railcar came out of the shed on the right. I’ve never seen railway wheels built like this, but they would offer lightness – a clear benefit for one-man hefting from the storage "track" to the main.




I read somewhere recently that these sorts or wheels were for the purpose of checking the gauge fomaintenance.

Mike
AlanL
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Posted: Thursday, October 17, 2013 - 10:42 PM UTC
Hi folks,

This is the tractor with the missing break handle. I need to source a couple of 'engine' numbers for the sides, but this part is pretty much done.









Cheers

Al
AlanL
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Posted: Tuesday, October 15, 2013 - 06:18 AM UTC
Hi Michael,

Many thanks. Still working on the stowage lol.

Cheers


Al
165thspc
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Posted: Tuesday, October 15, 2013 - 12:46 AM UTC
Beautiful, beautiful work!

Kudos
AlanL
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Posted: Monday, October 14, 2013 - 10:21 AM UTC
Hi Dick,

Missing brake arrived today. That should finish the tractor off.

Al
AlanL
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Posted: Saturday, October 12, 2013 - 09:45 PM UTC
Bit more work on the stowage and figures. Although both figures are the same body I altered the legs and head on the 2nd option and with the equipment carried slightly differently I think they will be sufficient difference for them to blend together.





Cheers

Al
AlanL
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Posted: Friday, October 11, 2013 - 10:07 PM UTC
Hi folks,

Work continues on the loads and side track stowage.





Cheers

Al
AlanL
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Posted: Thursday, October 10, 2013 - 04:22 AM UTC
hi folks,

more players.

Al

AlanL
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Posted: Monday, October 07, 2013 - 03:38 AM UTC
Hi folks,

Hopefully I'll get a bit more don on these two chaps this afternoon.



Al

AlanL
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Posted: Sunday, October 06, 2013 - 10:30 PM UTC
Hi Charles,

Thanks for the top too pictures I hadn't see those before.

This is very much a British/Commonwealth thing. The British Army had moved to vehicle transport rather than rail. Both Germany and France had good narrow gauge stock that could be quickly deployed so it was a catch up game for the British when they realised how important the light railways were going to be in this new kind of warfare.

Didn't realise they were converted in Crewe but it makes sense as Crewe has always played a key role in the railways here. as it

Cheers

AL
velotrain
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Posted: Sunday, October 06, 2013 - 09:18 AM UTC
I have been researching the Ford Model T draisine, and discovered that it could more properly be called the Crewe-Ford light railway tractor, or simply the Crewe Tractor - as the British soldiers knew it. This also explains why you always see it with British soldiers. I’m guessing that the “draisine” appendage only came about because it largely served in France, and may have been a post-war convention. None of this info should be considered authoritative, and it comes from a multitude of sources.

And yes, there was a reason for retaining the steering wheel.




I have found a couple of detailed photos – still looking for one from the (British) shotgun side; although, based on the two images Alan posted, in front-line operation the driver likes to keep the front bench to himself.







Note the name on the front of the bench of the “un-crewed” one. I’m guessing the two well-dressed gents in the other one might be out for a test drive in England – that is likely a “works” number chalked/painted on the bonnet; it does have the later radiator. This could also be a “training” image.

These tractors were designed by the Chief Engineer (his daughter apparently had the initial idea) of the London North Western Railway (LNWR) at their main Crewe workshops in the UK. They were bought as body-less running chassis, and 138 were produced. They were designed to work on the very light track directly behind the frontline trenches. The trucks/wagons/cars that they pulled were very small/light weight.

I found this recollection:
“My father, as a young man, worked at an all-night petrol station near Bedford (England) He told me that he often had a convoy of several T Fords stop to refuel on their way from Trafford Park to London. They were bodyless with the drivers sitting on the petrol tank, some with cushions to ease the posterior. Now that would be an unenviable job in the winter!”
AlanL
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Posted: Sunday, October 06, 2013 - 08:55 AM UTC
Hi Charles,

Thanks for the info. Looking at all three wagons in the picture they all appear slightly different in finish. If they were boarded on site so to speak that may well be the case.

If you want to split the board in half that would be fairly easy to achieve. The kit was mastered by Gilles Sabatier so I assume he drew his references from somewhere.

I'm not going to worry too much about it at this stage as things are too far advanced, but keep us posted with your findings.

Great pictures BTW.

Cheers

Al
velotrain
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Posted: Sunday, October 06, 2013 - 08:35 AM UTC

Quoted Text


If you look at the two pics the width of the boards on the wagons seems to be correct.



Al – I guess we’re seeing different things, as the two photos are largely what generated my comment. Due to the low angle, and the more-or-less flush sides, it’s hard to get a good read. However, I enlarged and cropped the relevant part of both images and tried to enhance that detail as best I could.





There’s a slightly shorter and somewhat thicker board at the front of the first car, I’d say 4-6” wide – this board shows much better on the “underway” photo than the “loading” photo, but I’ve otherwise referenced the loading photo – it offers a somewhat better angle. The next board is a bit longer and darker. The third board has warped up at the near end, making it easy to judge the width of it and the previous board – again I’d say 4-6” for each.


Quoted Text


I'm guessing they just used the standard timber on the wagons that was used elsewhere although that's just my thoughts.



To approach it from another direction, I’d estimate the total deck length on the car at 10-12’, based on the lading shown in the images. Since the kit indicates 7 boards, that translates to a 17” or 20” board width, respectively. Even in this era, that would represent premium cuts, and there is no practical benefit to using them in this application - when narrower boards will do fine.

I doubt there’s any “standard timber” in a wartime environment. These short flat wagons were perhaps planked in England, with the same width used for all the boards, but it’s also possible that only the frames were shipped and the planking added at the port of arrival – or soon after. Aside from thickness, they needn’t necessarily be dimensional lumber.

I know it’s not your scale, but I noticed on another forum that W^D Models “may” be working on a PE kit for the Ford Draisine.

I found an interesting photo – and caption – in the book Two-Foot Rails to the Front, which has about 50 pages of mixed quality wartime photos, but very little text. I suspect the beaming fellow on the left is the benefactor of the free moving service.



Lastly, and somewhat OT, I couldn’t resist this image of a shy but happy Swedish boy out for a Sunday spin with his dad in this 1937 scene – no doubt the railcar came out of the shed on the right. I’ve never seen railway wheels built like this, but they would offer lightness – a clear benefit for one-man hefting from the storage "track" to the main.



For anyone interested in researching the trench railways, I have just ordered what seem to be the standard references in the field.

Narrow Gauge to No Man's Land
This covers American operations – and perhaps U.S. production for other countries. There is a reprint, and I found multiple sellers offering it for around $45. The price from the publisher is higher, as is that on Amazon. This is a big book and hardcover.

Narrow Gauge at War, Volumes 1 and 2

This covers all countries involved in trench railway operations, including many not widely discussed. After seeing high prices, even for the reprints, I discovered that it was best to go through the publisher. In this case, it's a benefit for North American buyers that they're paperback.
http://www.plateway.co.uk/

They may have another interesting publication available shortly – I’m trying to get more info.