login   |    register
Armor/AFV: Modern Armor
Modern armor in general.
Hosted by Darren Baker
Fine Molds JGSDF Type 60
majjanelson
Visit this Community
South Carolina, United States
Joined: December 14, 2006
KitMaker: 1,343 posts
Armorama: 972 posts
Posted: Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - 02:10 PM UTC
[NOTE - I've completed changing all of the imbedded picture links from PB to Imgur.]

[EDIT - fixed the three web links]

Some of my fellow model club members convinced me that I should start a build log of the Fine Molds JGSDF Type 60 APC that I’ve been reviewing for Armorama. Well, here’s the first few installments, but since this is my first ever build log, go easy on me.

I recently completed an In-Box Review for Armorama. Based on some of the items I found during the In Box Review, I planned to make some improvements and changes to the kit.

Since I planned to change the barrel of the Bow MG (A4) to improve its look, I did not install it along with the exterior Oval Ball part (A13) into the Upper Glacis (B19) as indicated in Step #1. After cleaning the flash around the torsion bar bolted cover plates that stick out of the bottom edges of the two Hull Side sections (B21 & B22), I glued them both to the Hull Bottom (A12), along with the “Engine Compartment Bulkhead” (B23) and the Lower Front Glacis (B41), as indicated in Steps #2 and #3.


One of the quite noticeable issues that I found during the in-box review was that the track Support Roller Brackets are molded solid to the hull side plates, when the real units are bolted to the sides of the hull and have through openings between the “legs”. I planned to remove the brackets from the hull sides, but I needed a backup plan in case I damaged them during removal. First, I made squash molds of the molded brackets from Green Stuff two-part putty, then I “cast” about a 50 brackets to get six decently molded copies. (I did the same to make backup parts for the rear tail lights, too) I then carefully sawed off each of the Support Roller Brackets, sanding smooth the bases and adding 0.020” thick sheet styrene to the bases to make up for the portions removed by the saw blade. Fortunately, all six of the brackets survived the process, since I wasn’t satisfied with the squash-molded ones. I then filled the cast holes in the sides of the hull plates (B21 & B22) with styrene tube and rod along with some putty.



I will glue on the Support Roller Brackets after I assemble the tracks to ensure they are located properly.

Before I installed the Rear Hull Plate (B20), I removed the Tail Light Housings to make them more accurate. I filed and cut down the surrounding tube guards so that only the taillight housings remained, and then glued round plastic rod to their backs for mounting posts. I then created tube guard brackets from plastic tube and sheet, along with some Grant Line hex bolts. I thinned the two small bracket plates that are on each side of the Rear Hull Plate (B20), but one broke off, so I made new ones from scrap PE strips that I bent to shape and drilled holes through. Other than an angle bracket for mounting a tool, the Rear Hull Plate (B20) is now smooth and just has various indentations in it. I then glued it to the Hull Rear as indicated in Step #3.



I skipped Step #4 and glued the Upper Glacis (B19) to the front of the Hull as indicated in Step #5. I then decided to cut the Hull Top (A15) into two pieces, since I had noticed that the forward “L” shaped section that has the Driver’s, Hull Gunner’s, and Track Commander’s hatch openings along with the louvers for the engine compartment is bolted to the top of the hull, while the rear section is welded to the top of the hull. This would allow the installation of the Hull MG after I modified it, along with adding crew figures into the hatches. I used the tip of a JLC Saw to scribe the panel line until the Hull Top separated into the two sections. I glued some thin styrene strips to the edges of the cut lines to make up for some of the plastic that was removed during scribing, along with some plastic angle pieces and strips to support the “bolted” portion of the top plate for when it would be installed later. I then glued the rear portion to the Hull assembly.




Since they seemed to be molded a little short, I removed the molded on triangle gussets from the Lower Hull Glacis (B41), and replaced them with four little triangles made from styrene sheet. I then glued the Drive Sprocket Housings (A8 & A11) and the Back Plates (A7 & A10), the Road Wheel Arms (C24 & C25), the Shocks (C16), along with the lower Rear Door Hinge Brackets (C18) to the Hull as shown in Steps #6 and #7.


Now that the main portions of the hull were together, I could add the missing weld beads along numerous edges of the plate joints. Reference photos show smooth weld beads that I decided that I could add by masking the sides of where the weld beads needed to be, and placing filling putty in between to form the welds. For the putty, I used Perfect Modeling Putty, made by Deluxe Materials (for an Armorama Review of Perfect Plastic Putty by Daren Baker), which is a filler putty that is really smooth and easily cleans up with water before it dries. After removing the masking tape, a little sanding rounded the edges and smoothed out the welds. The welds on the Rear Hull Plate joints are layered on the real Type 60 APCs, so I just masked a second set on top of the initial set of weld beads.




I also decided at this point that the hinge for the front portion of the large Troop Top Hatch (B33), which was molded as part of the Hull Top (A15), didn’t look right. The real hinge is a smaller rod with a rounded metal shield. So out came the JLC Saw again to remove them and sections of appropriately sized styrene rod and curved sheet styrene were glued in place. Then I decided that the other hinges on the other sections of the large Troop Top Hatch (B31, B32 & C27) along with the Rear Troop Doors (B29 & B34 + B36 & B38) were molded pretty faithfully, but that they lacked the hinge rods or pins that should connect them. So I drilled holes through the hinges, and installed plastic rod or copper wire as needed. All this made the Troop Hatches workable, but since there isn’t any interior, it only improved the looks with the hatches closed.





To make a more realistic looking Bow MG barrel (A4), I cutoff the barrel and created a new one from 0.020” diameter brass tube, a rolled section of Perforated Metal Plate (CRC06) from UMM-USA, with the tapered end fashioned from a piece of styrene rod drilled and sanded to shape. A pilot hole was then drilled into the remaining portion of part A4, and glued this and the exterior Oval Ball part (A13) into the Upper Glacis (B19).



Step #8 has you assemble the Drive Sprockets (C32 & C33), the Idlers (C26, C34 & C35), and the Road Wheels (C29, C30 & C31). The joints of the Idlers along the running surfaces required some filler, but make sure you don’t fill in the oval slots. There also was a noticeable gap around the outside of the Road Wheel outer lip (C31) to the outer Road Wheel (C29) that also needed a little filler. I used some more Perfect Plastic Putty to fill these gaps, this time using damp q-tips to remove excess putty around the rim of each road wheel. I also went ahead and glued the two Support Roller Parts (C22 & C23), since I planned to glue together the tracks together over temporarily installed suspension and then remove them for separate painting.




For the Tracks (C15, C37, C38, C40 & C41), I noticed that the guide horns are molded with some “trash” or “bulges” on their sides that shouldn’t be there. Possibly caused by damaged molds (?). I sanded the ends of each track link and then drilled holes in the ends of each track link for the connector pin, which took a LONG time.


On the Hull Top on the left side near the Large Troop Hatch, there were four tie-downs molded in solid plastic. I removed these and replaced them with 0.010” diameter copper wire.


The Rear Fenders had the rubber mud flaps molded onto them and were too thick. The mud flaps were cutoff, a groove cut into the edge of the fenders, and replacement flaps cut from aluminum foil to be glued into the slot.


The molded hex head bolts on the front section of the Hull Top appear to be too thin and too small, or vary in size when they shouldn’t. These are being removed and replaced with salami-slices of styrene hex rod.


Well, that's it for now.
SdAufKla
Visit this Community
South Carolina, United States
Joined: May 07, 2010
KitMaker: 2,226 posts
Armorama: 2,147 posts
Posted: Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - 03:07 PM UTC
Jeff,

You know this is a build after my own heart. Why, it's almost right out-of-the-box just like I like 'em!

It's nice to get a chance to look at the work you're putting into this in a nice, leisurely way, too. I never have enough time at the club meetings to take my time.

Great photography and documentation as well as first class craftsmanship!

Hope to see more soon.
C_JACQUEMONT
Visit this Community
Loire-Atlantique, France
Joined: October 09, 2004
KitMaker: 2,423 posts
Armorama: 2,315 posts
Posted: Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - 10:20 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Why, it's almost right out-of-the-box just like I like 'em!



I wonder if we're looking at the same thread?

Very impressive detailing, I'd like to get and build that kit but I don't think I'd go to such lengths... That said I'm very impressed.

Cheers,

Christophe
SdAufKla
Visit this Community
South Carolina, United States
Joined: May 07, 2010
KitMaker: 2,226 posts
Armorama: 2,147 posts
Posted: Thursday, October 24, 2013 - 12:47 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Why, it's almost right out-of-the-box just like I like 'em!



I wonder if we're looking at the same thread?

Christophe



Sorry, Christophe, that comment was an inside joke between friends. Don't take it too seriously.
gcdavidson
Visit this Community
Ontario, Canada
Joined: August 05, 2003
KitMaker: 1,691 posts
Armorama: 1,557 posts
Posted: Thursday, October 24, 2013 - 01:54 AM UTC
Great Build Log Jeff!
majjanelson
Visit this Community
South Carolina, United States
Joined: December 14, 2006
KitMaker: 1,343 posts
Armorama: 972 posts
Posted: Thursday, October 24, 2013 - 02:52 AM UTC
Thank you Mike, Christophe and Graeme for your comments and encouragement.

Mike's being quite sarcastic about the "it's almost right out-of-the-box just like I like 'em!", since those of us in the AMPS Central SC club think he would turn into a newt if he had to STRICTLY build OOB. His current build of Riich Model's "Universal Carrier Mk.I" shows what we're referring to.
majjanelson
Visit this Community
South Carolina, United States
Joined: December 14, 2006
KitMaker: 1,343 posts
Armorama: 972 posts
Posted: Saturday, December 20, 2014 - 09:31 AM UTC
[Picture Links Corrected]

Well, it’s been quite a while since I last updated this build log. Over a year, actually. I am obviously NOT a model builder who posts pictures as the build progresses. I’m also a VERY slow builder, but real life and other projects have kept me from working this build.

In fact, I’ve nearly finished the assembly and detail corrections.




First off, I was able to correct the Troop Hatch hinge by using formed foil to replicate the rolled cover over the brass hinge rod along with PE “washers” at each end. I also drilled through the hatch hinges and inserted styrene rod to replicate the hinge pins:


I then drilled through holes in the Tow Shackles (C3 & C13), inserted styrene rod pins, and then I drilled the styrene rod pins for 1/24 scale Stock Car PE “Hood Pins” inserted into each end of the tow shackle pins. This was done for both the front and rear tow shackles. I also thinned the edges of both the front (B24 & B25) and the rear ((B39 & B40) fenders to look more like a correct scale thickness, and I also replaced the molded rear mud flaps with metal foil on the rear fenders, plus I added Grant Line bolt heads to the fenders to replace poorly molded ones:




I installed the Rear Troop Doors ((B29 & B34) along with their Hinge Brackets (B36 & B38). I added Grant Line Hex Head Bolts and weld beads made from Milliput to the hinges of the Rear Troop Doors. I glued on the scratch-built Taillight Guard Housings and scrap PE sheet “Antenna” Brackets (that’s what these look like they would be used for in actual pictures of the Type 60). Using a sharp chisel blade and sanding sticks, I removed the molded on Fuel Can mounting lugs from the left hand Troop Door. I cutoff the molded solid details and created a replacement Locking Hasp from copper wire and glued them to the Rear Troop Door Handle (B28) and right hand Rear Troop Door.


I was tempted to replace the kit parts for the two Fuel Cans (assembled in Step 15 of the instructions) since they are molded with the mounting brackets and straps on them. Once I assembled them I decided just to cut off the two molded lumps on each side that were supposed to be the metal angle brackets and bolt heads. I cut and bent small pieces of scrap PE fret and added Grant Line Hex Head Bolts, finally gluing them to the kit Fuel Cans. Somewhere along the way the carpet monster ate one the Fuel Can Lids (C7), so I had to scratch-build a replacement. Once the modified Fuel Cans are glued to Rear Troop Door it should look more like the real item. The kit parts for the Engine Air Intake Shroud (A21) and the Exhaust Pipe (B37) just needed their edges thinned to look more correct for scale-thickness.


I added a styrene “Shelf”, copper wire Handle, a new Jack Head, and Mounting Clamp with a wing nut to kit provided Hydraulic Jack (B27). I also drilled out the tube bracket that the Jack Handle would be inserted into. I then glued the reworked Hydraulic Jack to the left side of the rear Hull Plate below the Taillight Guard.

Now the next kit part (B26) I thought was another type of jack, but after looking at pictures of the real thing, I’m still not sure what it is or its function. My best guess is it’s used to raise Road Wheel Arms so the Road Wheels can be removed. Well, this “widget” was almost completely reworked using styrene details, copper wire, styrene rod drift pins & PE “Hood Pins” inserted into their end, new hook head, and PE mounting brackets added to the right side of the rear hull plate below the Taillight Guards.


The kit supplied Hatch Hold-Open Catches Bracket (C5) were molded solid. The real brackets were made from steel strips welded to a block, with a hinge pin through the pivoting catch lever. I scratch-built brackets from styrene strip and copper wire for the hinge. I then cut and sanded the kit supplied Hatch Hold -Open Catches down to just the pivoting catch lever, and installed these into the replacement brackets. With this change I can now position the pivoting catch lever to hold open the Bow Gunner’s Hatch.


One of the kit supplied Tow Cable Shackles (B4) is molded into its Mounting Bracket, while the other is molded separate. Pictures of the real Mounting Bracket show that it has opens slot that the Tow Shackle is inserted into and a retaining bolt is then inserted through the bracket and shackle. I scratch-built a replacement Mounting Bracket from styrene angle and strip, with Grant Line Hex Head Bolts. Since I was pretty sure I would damage or destroy the kit supplied Tow Cable Shackle (B4) that is molded into its Mounting Bracket, I created two new ones from copper wire, styrene tubing and rod. I’ll probably replace the kit supplied string with twisted copper wire for the Tow Rope, since the string probably won’t lay down in a realistic manner.


The Fine Molds PE Detail Up Set provides replacement Light Guards (#1, #3 & #8) for the injection molded parts (B12, B13, B14, B15, B16 & B17). Fine Molds even provides forms to help you bend the guards to the correct shape. The Headlights Brackets (B9 & B10) and the Blackout Light (B18) have mounting brackets that are molded too thick. I thinned these to be more in-scale, and also added copper wire and styrene rod “plug connectors” along with Model Kasten Hex Head Bolts drilled out for wire grommets. I also added a wire for the Horn (B13). I used Gator Grip glue to install the PE guards since the ends of the PE brackets didn’t provide much for attachment points. I used thin super glue to stiffen the attachment points. I’ll install the Headlight Guards (#9 & #10) after painting and installation of the clear Headlight Lenses (D4). I added a styrene disk to the back of the Horn (B13) to cover a sink mark.


Next I installed the Detail Up PE set Tool Brackets per the Fine Molds instructions, but left them open for later installation of the tools after painting. For the Track Clamp Tools (B1 & B2) I replaced the screw rods with copper wire scribed with a “screw” pattern. I also added Track Mounting Brackets to the Spare Tracks (C28) using styrene strip and Grant Line Hex Head Bolts.


Now we come to the Antennas (A1 & A3). The real items appear to have an insulator base and aerials had stepped, thicker bases with a thin whip. The kit parts are molded much too thick, plus the bases are molded as one solid piece. The actual bases, though made completely different from each other, both allowed for tilting the antennas to the rear for clearing power lines or other overhead obstructions. I decided to scratch-build replacements; the left hand unit from styrene tube, angle and strip; I used scrap PE fret strip and Grant Line Bolts to create the box-shaped right hand unit. For both aerials, I used aluminum & brass tubing, and thin guitar string. The Antenna Guard came from the Fine Molds Detail Up PE set.




The long section of the antennas (made from brass tubing and guitar skin) is removable for transporting the model.
I scratch-built a replacement for the Large Troop Hatch Open Catch (B6) from styrene strip & rod, along with a coiled copper wire for a spring. The kit part was molded standing straight up when it should be at an angle.


For the Driver’s Hatch (A36), I Scratch-built Swing Stops and Hold-Up Bolts from styrene rod & Grant Line Hex Bolts. For the Track Commander’s Hatch (A25, A26 & C4) I replaced the Hinge Rod (A28) with a 0.040” diameter styrene rod and salami sliced styrene tubing disks. I also added three brass wire lifting loops and a copper wire hatch handle. The Bow Gunner’s Hatch (A27) only needed a replacement coiled copper wire, a small styrene block, and a brass wire hinge rod to replace the poorly molded part of the kit hatch. I scratch-built a replacement Fuel Filler Cap to replace the kit part (A22) from styrene sheet and rod, along with copper wire for the retaining pin and hinge.


Since I plan to have the Track Commander’s, Driver’s, Bow Gunner’s and Heavy Machine Gunner’s hatches open, I added details to the insides of these hatches. I scratch-built a Commander’s Hatch latching mechanism with palm release switch and internal handles from styrene sheet, scrap PE strip, and brass wire. I also scratch-built the Gunner’s Hatch Locking Handle from styrene sheet and rod. I’ll cover the Heavy Machine Gunner’s hatch later.

After looking at pictures of the real thing, I made a replacement Fire-Extinguisher Activator (B5) from PE strips, styrene sheet, Grant Line & Model Kasten hex head bolts, which looks much more realistic than the original kit part.


The Heavy Machine Gunner’s Weapon Station is likely a focal point of the top of the Type 60 APC. Although its details looked pretty good, I soon realized the Fine Molds kit provided 0.50 cal M2 MG (A40) was too thin, pretty much over its entire length, but especially across the cooling jacket and main body. It’s a shame too, since it has a separate Feed Cover (A43), Spade Grips (A41), and Charging Handle (A42). After looking at pictures of the real parts, I also noticed the too thick Ammo Box Holder (A38), and the overly simplified 0.50 cal MG Mount (A30 & A31), and the Lower Gun Shield (A39). I found a replacement DML 0.50 cal M2 from my spares, but I used the better molded Fine Molds Spade Grips and Charging Handle kit parts. I scratch-built a new 0.50 cal MG Mount from styrene sheet, scrap PE strip, Grant Line bolt heads and brass wire. I did use the kit-supplied Upper Gun Shield (A32), but I thinned it and added better looking bolt heads from styrene hex rod.


This image shows the start of replacement 0.50 cal MG Mount with the scratch-built lower gun shield, the swivel and the elevation yoke made from styrene angle, strip and rod. You can also see the start of the elevation adjustment mechanism, made from styrene rod, copper wire and scrap PE strip. It also shows the replacement DML 0.50 cal M2 with the start of the MG recoil cradle, made from styrene strip. You can also see the much more narrow kit provided M2 MG, even though it and the DML M2 are essentially the same length. I did use the replacement 0.50 cal Ammo Box Holder (#15) from the Fine Molds Detail Up PE set, which is more detailed with more of a sheet-metal look, and is also a little larger. The 0.50 cal Ammo Can is from a Academy MG Set.


I cut the barrel off the replacement DML 0.50 cal M2, added a styrene rod section, drilled out the holes in the cooling jacket, and added PE scraps for detailing the sights & the trigger. I scratch-built latching handles and hatch strap handles from styrene strip, scrap PE strips and foil and added them to the undersides of the Heavy Machine Gunners Hatches (A33 & A34).


The replacement 0.50 cal MG pins into the Cradle Mount with two brass pins just like the real thing. I’ve already replaced the bent copper wire with a detailed locking pin.


For the exterior of the hatches, I made hatch handles, locking hasps, and hinge pins from difference sizes of copper wire. For the hatch hold-open keepers that are located on the Rotating Hatch Ring (A24), I made more realistic ones from scrap PE to replace the kit molded “bumps”, one on each side of the hatch frame to align with the prongs on the hatch halves. You can also see how much thinner the Gun Shield (A32) is and the replacement hex head bolts.




For the suspension and tracks, I installed the Road Wheel Arms (C24 & C25), Shocks (C16), the Idler Wheel Tensioner Mechanism & Road Wheel Arms (A6, A9, C19, & C21), but I separated the Tensioner Mechanism from the Road Wheel Arm so that I could adjust the position of the Idler Wheels’ position when installing the tracks. I used Teflon Plumber’s Tape to temporarily install the Drive Sprockets (), Road Wheels (), Idlers () and the Support Rollers (C23). Then I glued the Tracks ((C15, C37, C38, C40, C41) into two sections for each side, with a cold joint below the last Road Wheels and at the top of the Drive Sprockets.




A couple more pics of my progress so far:




Now I can hopefully get back to work on this project, finishing up a few other details and adding the crewmen along with the mounting ”brackets” that I’ll need to create to hold them inside the hatches. Then it’s Painting Time!

Merry Christmas, everyone!
C_JACQUEMONT
Visit this Community
Loire-Atlantique, France
Joined: October 09, 2004
KitMaker: 2,423 posts
Armorama: 2,315 posts
Posted: Saturday, December 20, 2014 - 07:40 PM UTC
Great work! Thank you for sharing.

I'm getting one of those for Christmas, bookmarking this thread for future reference.

Cheers,

Christophe
SdAufKla
Visit this Community
South Carolina, United States
Joined: May 07, 2010
KitMaker: 2,226 posts
Armorama: 2,147 posts
Posted: Saturday, December 20, 2014 - 08:02 PM UTC
Beautiful construction work, Jeff!

I'm really glad to see an update.

You've sure reworked every square mm of this. The Fine Molds kit was very nice to start, but you've brought the detail up to an entirely higher level.

As always, I'll be looking forward to seeing the build in person and your next update.
KurtLaughlin
Visit this Community
Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: January 18, 2003
KitMaker: 2,015 posts
Armorama: 1,990 posts
Posted: Sunday, December 21, 2014 - 12:50 AM UTC
Neat.

An idea for hinges: Rather than drilling them out (which can be risky and difficult to access) I put a small disk of plastic on either end to simulate the pin.

I think the rear hull "widget" might be a towing pintle.

KL
C_JACQUEMONT
Visit this Community
Loire-Atlantique, France
Joined: October 09, 2004
KitMaker: 2,423 posts
Armorama: 2,315 posts
Posted: Sunday, December 21, 2014 - 01:58 AM UTC
Funny, I was thinking the same thing (punch & die plastic discs).

Cheers,

Christophe
majjanelson
Visit this Community
South Carolina, United States
Joined: December 14, 2006
KitMaker: 1,343 posts
Armorama: 972 posts
Posted: Sunday, December 21, 2014 - 05:09 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Neat.

An idea for hinges: Rather than drilling them out (which can be risky and difficult to access) I put a small disk of plastic on either end to simulate the pin.

I think the rear hull "widget" might be a towing pintle.

KL



I believe you are correct, Kurt. Have you seen a similar removable tow pintle on other military vehicles?

After looking at the rear of the Type 60 APC, there are two brackets spaced about the same as the width of the "widget" and have two open hole thru them spaced about right to match the reinforced thru holes on the "widget". So this should be a removable tow pintle that is mounted with the drift pins that hold it to the storage brackets. It also appears to have a "clamping" or "closing" function as evident by the small levers on each side and that it looks like it has a short-stroke hydraulic or pneumatic pressure cylinder on the right end. These two pictures from a Japanese-language site show the two brackets centered under the rear doors:





Now i have to decide if I want to rework the mounting plates to allow the installation of the Tow Pintle to show off this neat feature.

And yes, using small punched styrene disks can be used to simulate the hinges, but I don't have a sub-miniature punch set. I had to be REAL careful drilling the holes for the hinge pins.

Thank you!
majjanelson
Visit this Community
South Carolina, United States
Joined: December 14, 2006
KitMaker: 1,343 posts
Armorama: 972 posts
Posted: Sunday, December 21, 2014 - 05:20 AM UTC
Thank you for looking in, Christophe.

I'm honored that you might use what I've done when you build your Type 60 APC kit.

I would advise that you should get the Fine Molds PE Detail Up set, though. It really improves the look of the kit. Fine Molds should have included it in the kit, though, considering the cost of the kit, and how hard it can be to get the PE set. I had to order mine from HobbyLink.
majjanelson
Visit this Community
South Carolina, United States
Joined: December 14, 2006
KitMaker: 1,343 posts
Armorama: 972 posts
Posted: Sunday, December 21, 2014 - 05:24 AM UTC
Thank you for the kudos, Mike.

Coming from you they mean a great deal. I hope to one day reach your master level, but I don't know if I have the 30 years or so that it may take to get there.

Hopefully, I'll have some progress that will show at our next club meeting in January.

Damn! It's 15 YEARS since Y2K! Boy time flies!
KurtLaughlin
Visit this Community
Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: January 18, 2003
KitMaker: 2,015 posts
Armorama: 1,990 posts
Posted: Sunday, December 21, 2014 - 08:47 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text


I think the rear hull "widget" might be a towing pintle.

KL



I believe you are correct, Kurt. Have you seen a similar removable tow pintle on other military vehicles?

After looking at the rear of the Type 60 APC, there are two brackets spaced about the same as the width of the "widget" and have two open hole thru them spaced about right to match the reinforced thru holes on the "widget". So this should be a removable tow pintle that is mounted with the drift pins that hold it to the storage brackets. It also appears to have a "clamping" or "closing" function as evident by the small levers on each side and that it looks like it has a short-stroke hydraulic or pneumatic pressure cylinder on the right end.



On most US tanks since WW II there is a bracket welded to the hull but the towing pintle itself is removable.

Rather than any sort of fluid cylinder the cylindrical shape is probably a coil spring or stack of belleville springs. The two loops on either side of the pintle plates could be for safety chains. I don't see any electrical socket for the trailer. It may be that fitting above the jack, or it could be behind the stowed pintle.

KL
majjanelson
Visit this Community
South Carolina, United States
Joined: December 14, 2006
KitMaker: 1,343 posts
Armorama: 972 posts
Posted: Sunday, January 24, 2016 - 08:28 AM UTC
[Picture Links Corrected]

Once again, another year has flown by. I had progressed along well during the beginning of 2015, and then had to set this project aside to work on artwork for the upcoming 2016 AMPS International Convention this April. For the last few weeks I’ve actually been able to get back to the Type 60 APC and I am almost finished with all of the construction.

First off, here are few images showing more of how I assembled the suspension and the tracks into two sections per side:













With the Kurt Laughlin’s help, I figured out that the “Widget” (B26) is a Removable Towing Pintle that is stored on the right side of the rear plate (B20). When it’s used, it’s installed between the Towing Pintle Mounting Brackets (C9) under the Rear Troop Doors (B29 & B34). I ended up reworking the Towing Pintle to make it more accurate, and made new Mounting Brackets to allow installation of the Pintle for towing.





When I added the Grant Line Bolts to the Front & Rear Fenders, I let the ends protrude through to their undersides like reference pictures I found on the web.


I next decided to replace the undersized looking Hull Gunner’s Periscope (D3), so I used a PE Periscope Holder/Mount from an old Verlinden #263 Sherman Super Detail Set. I then created a replacement Periscope from Clear Sheet Plastic (actually a razor safety cover), Styrene Strip and Rod. I sanded and polished a bevel edge to the periscope and added a strip of metal foil, using Future Floor Polish as the fixative and protective coating. The Periscope slides into the PE Holder.





I then used the same method to create replacement Periscopes for the Driver’s Hatch Periscopes (D2). These have a beveled edge on each end that are on opposite sides. I also added a strip of thin Styrene Sheet and rounded blocks of Styrene Strip to create the Drivers Hatch Interior similar to a reference photo.



Then I decided that with all of the hatches open and even with figures installed, I needed to add something to the interior instead of leaving it bare. I added some parts from an old Tamiya M2 Bradley Interior set and some 0.50 cal and 7.62 mm Ammo Cans from the spares box. The Seats were adjusted and given copper wire “pins” to allow mounting the figures at the proper height in each hatch.



From what I have seen in pictures of actual Type 60 APCs in use by the JGSDF, they have welded small steel loops along the bottom and top edges of the hull sides and front glacis to allow stringing cord or wire in a large mesh pattern. The crews then use this to retain bundles of long grass in place for realistic camouflage. I created small oval loops of copper wire using a strip of PE fret as a form. I measured and marked locations on the hull using a pencil compass, and then I drilled small shallow holes to mark the locations and also help with the glue adhesion.





When I tried to adjust the hatch hold-open keepers that are located on the Rotating Hatch Ring (A24) of the 0.50 cal MG Hatch, the thin plastic of the hinges on the ring and on the hatch halves failed. Yep, I shouldn’t have drilled out the hinge tabs for copper wire, which weakened the plastic, but live and learn. I had to create replacement hinges, and while I was at it, I added missing Hex Bolt Heads around the top of the MG Hatch Ring (A24). Well, there were bumps, but they were very noticeable like the real thing. Anyway, these pictures show what I did.


For the figures, I decided to modify a set of Academy ROK Armor Crewman, #1369, mainly because they were close to what JGSDF Crewmen looked like and they were cheap compared to some actual resin JGSDF Crewmen.















I also created the crewmen’s Intercom Microphones, Wires and Control Boxes from Copper Wire and Styrene Strip.



I’m not sure what uniform pattern I’ll paint the crew, yet. The Digi-Cam pattern would look real good, but difficult to do.



Next up will be cleaning and painting! I’m trying to get this finished in time for the AMPS 2016 International Convention on April.
C_JACQUEMONT
Visit this Community
Loire-Atlantique, France
Joined: October 09, 2004
KitMaker: 2,423 posts
Armorama: 2,315 posts
Posted: Sunday, January 24, 2016 - 08:54 AM UTC
Wow, just wow!

Special request : bring this to AMPS even if you don't manage to finish it in time.

Cheers,

Christophe
Keef1648
Visit this Community
South Carolina, United States
Joined: January 23, 2008
KitMaker: 1,238 posts
Armorama: 1,190 posts
Posted: Sunday, January 24, 2016 - 05:36 PM UTC
Great to see you back at your work desk and getting to grips with this model. I am in awe of the amount of work required to fix what is obviously needed to make the model accurate and correct its flaws, in the end it will very worth while.

I know you have had other fish to fry and benched this beast in order to help the 2016 AMPS competition and for that everybody concerned should be very grateful.

You have helped me countless times and now it is time to dedicate yourself to finishing this beast.

Great work Jeff and thank you for the update.

Keith.
Removed by original poster on 01/25/16 - 14:11:53 (GMT).
majjanelson
Visit this Community
South Carolina, United States
Joined: December 14, 2006
KitMaker: 1,343 posts
Armorama: 972 posts
Posted: Sunday, January 24, 2016 - 07:28 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Wow, just wow!

Special request : bring this to AMPS even if you don't manage to finish it in time.

Cheers,

Christophe



Thank you, Christophe.

Yes, I will bring this to the AMPS 2016 International Convention, but I'm going to try REALLY hard to get this done.
majjanelson
Visit this Community
South Carolina, United States
Joined: December 14, 2006
KitMaker: 1,343 posts
Armorama: 972 posts
Posted: Sunday, January 24, 2016 - 07:31 PM UTC

Quoted Text

... You have helped me countless times and now it is time to dedicate yourself to finishing this beast.

Great work Jeff and thank you for the update.

Keith.



Thank you for your kind words, Keith.

Helping each other out is what friends and modeling compatriots are supposed to do, right?
SdAufKla
Visit this Community
South Carolina, United States
Joined: May 07, 2010
KitMaker: 2,226 posts
Armorama: 2,147 posts
Posted: Sunday, January 24, 2016 - 08:02 PM UTC
Jeff, although I don't patronize Armorma any more, since I was following this thread since way back, I did want to log back on to offer my complements.

It's really good to see you back at this build again. You've put so much work into it, it would be a shame not to finish.

In addition to the most excellent level of workmanship on the model, though, I'd like to say that you've really set a new standard for the quality of the build blog, itself.

I'll really be looking forward to seeing this at our next meeting, and I'm also looking forward to seeing it with some paint!

Great work all around!
majjanelson
Visit this Community
South Carolina, United States
Joined: December 14, 2006
KitMaker: 1,343 posts
Armorama: 972 posts
Posted: Sunday, January 24, 2016 - 08:25 PM UTC
Mike,

Thank you for your kind works of encouragement. Coming from you means a great deal to me.


Quoted Text

In addition to the most excellent level of workmanship on the model, though, I'd like to say that you've really set a new standard for the quality of the build blog, itself.



I blame Terry Ashley's review method on his Perth Military Modelling Site (PMMS) and my PowerPoint Ranger Tab I received from all that time in the military.
dvarettoni
Visit this Community
South Carolina, United States
Joined: September 28, 2005
KitMaker: 778 posts
Armorama: 763 posts
Posted: Wednesday, January 27, 2016 - 02:22 AM UTC
jeff looking great I do hope that you can finish before the show
dave
majjanelson
Visit this Community
South Carolina, United States
Joined: December 14, 2006
KitMaker: 1,343 posts
Armorama: 972 posts
Posted: Wednesday, January 27, 2016 - 02:44 AM UTC

Quoted Text

jeff looking great I do hope that you can finish before the show
dave



Thank you, Dave, that's what I'm trying to do (fingers-crossed).