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Tasca M4A1 Grizzly Guardian
M4A3E8Easy8
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Posted: Saturday, February 03, 2018 - 08:39 AM UTC
Love the pics, Not only good reference for the Grizzly but look at all the dirt and weathering on that tank. I will add this site for your reference stash. Not to mention if you have a quater million US just sitting around you can have the ultimate reference piece. Give it a look...

http://www.armyjeeps.net/Grizzly0830/1943%20Sherman%20Grizzly.htm

Kharkov
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Posted: Saturday, February 03, 2018 - 06:26 AM UTC
Hannibal The Cannibal

After finding these pictures on the Internet, I was going to just use them for reference, cut them up, that kinda nonsense, but they are good quality, well taken and nicely posed, so I figured what the hell, they deserve a post all of their own, It's not often that I find good quality pictures of a subject that I'm interested in these days, well, regarding tanks anyway, most pictures are done from a 'walkround' perspective, highlighting detail, or they are butchered with watermarks and logo's, that kinda thing.

These pictures were taken at the War and Peace Revival/Festival/Show (whatever they are calling it these days) that took place in 2015, the show is held near Folkstone in Kent, and for anyone who isn't geographically aware, that's in the UK, just think of a port town, south-east England, that kinda thing, you're near enough.









If these four pictures don't inspire you to build a Sherman M4A1 of any type, not just a Grizzly, then I don't think anything will, well, apart from all those thousands of 'action' shots of the Sherman at war, that tend to inspire us to build a model or regain our interest in the hobby that time forgot, but I'm not counting them, forget them...


And below, the wondrous thing that is Youtube, this is worth a watch just for the incredible sound of the engine, if you are one of those mechanically minded people, love engines, taking things apart for no other reason than to find out how they work, motorbikes, that kinda thing, then you should like this.




Star of the show, that marshall on the kettenkrad, he's not messing around...




Matt
Kharkov
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Posted: Saturday, February 03, 2018 - 03:06 AM UTC


Kharkov - "It puts the lotion in the bucket? Snuggles?"
Snuggles - "Not today Dad thx, I've already moisturized, looking after my skin..."
Kharkov - "No,...Snuggles, IT, puts the LOTION, in the BUCKET?"
Snuggles - "Nope,...still not with you Dad..."
Kharkov - "Oh for Gods sake,...HANNIBAL! Snuggles?"
Snuggles - "Hannibal? But he was crazy Dad?"
Kharkov - "The Tank,..Snuggles?"
Snuggles - "There's a tank called..."
Kharkov - "Forget it."





He's on the next page...
Kharkov
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Posted: Saturday, February 03, 2018 - 03:04 AM UTC
M4A1 Grizzly Applique Armour Options

Well, as far as I can tell, you have three options with the Sherman Grizzly, as highlighted in the three pictures below, In all three cases the turret should be basically the same, it should have cast-in thickened cheek armour on the right hand side and no pistol port on the left, but the hull can vary, and can be grouped into three versions as follows: 1. Nothing at all, no hull applique, 2. It can have cast-in applique, 3. Or it can have welded-on applique.

Does that kinda make any sense? I read it through and it sounded like gibberish...


1. Picture Above, Turret cast-in thickened cheek, with no hull applique armour, this is the Bovington Grizzly, and there doesn't seem to be that many examples with no hull applique armour whatsoever, or at least I have not see that many examples on the internet, someone probably knows the exact number...


2. Picture above, Turret cast-in thickened cheek, with welded-on applique armour plates, this is a good example of the crazy cutting and welding of the applique armour plates that was required to make the flat plates conform to the cast M4A1 hull, which has a lot of curves, very much like a good woman.


3. Picture above, Turret cast-in thickened cheek, with cast-in applique hull, and last but not least, my favourite version which is not as rare as the number one example but I think it's fair to say that cast-in applique is not as common as welded-on applique, I prefer the look of cast-in applique, it just seems to add more curves to the hull and seems to blend in better.


Pictures below, two good close up shots of the different types of applique armour, on the left is the crazy cut and weld version with the single plate cut into seven pieces, which is rare, more normal would be five, and then welded on, and on the right is a closer shot of the cast-in applique armour, which looks to have been cleaned up after casting with some kind of grinder, and also seems to vary in thickness quite badly, which is a little surprising.





Pictures above, a good close up of the more common version of the welded-on applique armour plates, notice that the forward most plate has only been cut into five pieces on this example, another thing that is worthy of note in this picture is the welded-on sand shield bracket/rail which has been cut to in effect fit around the welded plates, allowing the top edge to be welded to hull, the same thing is done on cast-in applique examples.




Matt
Kharkov
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Posted: Saturday, February 03, 2018 - 02:49 AM UTC


And while on the subject of better pictures, at long last I've also managed to find a good quality picture showing the FDA being installed on a hull, the picture here is during a restoration job obv, and this is good because it clearly shows the little FDA guide bracket that is welded to the hull, which then bolts to the FDA once it is in place.

I used to think that this little bracket was to help guide the FDA into place during installation, but after looking at this picture, I think it just helps to bolt everything up tight once the FDA is installed, but I suppose it could help guide the FDA in as well, whatever...



Kharkov
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Posted: Friday, February 02, 2018 - 07:47 AM UTC


And at long last I've found a much better picture, which handily for me has been taken from square on (well almost) and from the back, and also from fairly close in, this gives a good idea of the width and the depth of the rain gutter, which is good because it means I can fairly accurately guestimate it when the time comes to add this feature to my Tasca hull, who knows, I might even push the boat out and actually take some measurements for a change...



And this picture above might shed a little light on the subject, a nice little picture showing a cast hull with a 'rain gutter' being machined at the factory, so maybe something to do with the machining process.


Kharkov
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Posted: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 01:45 AM UTC

Quoted Text

If you are talking about that round hole in the rear of the tank highlighted in the square???



Sorry Mike, that was my fault for not being clear with my highlight square, hopefully this picture below will better explain things.



The term 'Rain Gutter' refers to the recessed area in the casting of the rear of the hull, there's a channel that has been formed above where the crank handle hole is located (highlighted in my new square) it's referred to as a rain gutter, but it's purpose is unknown.

Still good info though, I learn something new every day.


Quoted Text

Engine oil will have accumulated in the lower cylinders of the radial and if you simply try to start the engine as-is you stand a fair chance of blowing the cylinder head off one or more of the lower pistons.



It must of been hard turning that radial engine over with a hand crank if oil has leaked into the lower pots, there's a chance it would all just compression lock.


Matt
Kharkov
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Posted: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 01:13 AM UTC
Hello Russ,


Quoted Text

Man, talk about a blast from the past... I started over, back with page 1, just to get in the mood again.
This thread is so old, SK has gone to the great food bowl in the sky, we've moved, and I haven't built (or even started) a Sherman in well over a year.



That begs the question, did it get you in the mood again? (lol) and yes this thread is so old that there's actually some new info on the web regarding the Grizzly, so I'm still tidying up and sorting out loose ends, that kinda thing, constant edits in the build log.

And there's nothing like a good old house move to cause chaos for a model maker that's for sure, you should do a build log here on old Armadrama, could do a Sherman, (I found some nice high quality pictures of a Sherman Grizzly that will get you in the mood for a Sherman, I'll post them in the build log at some point) or a Merk maybe, lots of new Merk kits at the mo you lucky sod


Matt
165thspc
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Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 11:28 AM UTC
If you are talking about that round hole in the rear of the tank highlighted in the square??? That is where you insert the engine crank. Applies only to radial engined Shermans. If it has been a bit since the engine has been run you (and two or three of your best friends) will need to turn the engine over a number of times using the crank.

Engine oil will have accumulated in the lower cylinders of the radial and if you simply try to start the engine as-is you stand a fair chance of blowing the cylinder head off one or more of the lower pistons.

That is why you often see, in old movies, the flight crew of a B 17 or 24 doing the "propeller walk", using the propellers to turn the radial engines over to redistribute the engine oil before starting.

Or maybe you were referring to something else in the photo. In which case, as Gilda would say, "never mind".
rfbaer
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Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 07:09 AM UTC
Man, talk about a blast from the past... I started over, back with page 1, just to get in the mood again.
This thread is so old, SK has gone to the great food bowl in the sky, we've moved, and I haven't built (or even started) a Sherman in well over a year.
Kharkov
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Posted: Monday, January 22, 2018 - 08:06 AM UTC
Derek Gomez

Quoted Text

It might be that General Steel casted the hull like that. Just the way they cut the master.



It could be yes, it could just be something to do with the casting process used for a period of time by General Steel, and was then replaced/phased out.



easyco69

Quoted Text

Once your done the lower hull, you should make resin copies of it through mold making rubber.
I'd buy one.



I thought about making some resin copies of my FDA endplates because they are a complete pain in the ass to make, and can be used on many Sherman builds, but I've never considered doing a resin hull, the eternal problem with large resin parts is warping/twisting.

And I have no experience with resin, so it would be a very steep learning curve


Kharkov
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Posted: Monday, January 22, 2018 - 07:47 AM UTC
Maschinen Krueger


Quoted Text

I'm new to the party here. What an amazing thread. You have some real scratch skills. I hope to see your future progress on this soon.



Thank you, and welcome to the party, your Super Pershing is looking very good indeed.

http://www.maschinenkrueger.com/joomla/ - You have some very cool builds

easyco69
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Posted: Monday, January 22, 2018 - 02:44 AM UTC
Once your done the lower hull, you should make sesin copies of it through mold making rubber.
I'd buy one. )
DG0542
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Posted: Sunday, January 21, 2018 - 11:04 PM UTC
It might be that General Steel casted the hull like that. Just the way they cut the master.
MaKrueger
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Posted: Sunday, January 21, 2018 - 10:54 PM UTC
I'm new to the party here. What an amazing thread. You have some real scratch skills. I hope to see your future progress on this soon.
Kharkov
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Posted: Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 08:45 PM UTC

Quoted Text

A blast from the past... Now go out to the shed and get your little blue knife from all the motor bike stuff and pick this one back up.



A blast from the past... has it really been that long? I lose track of time, It's an age thing I think...

I've come to the conclusion that model making is a self destructive hobby, dangerous for both mind and body, you need a break from the madness sometimes, anyway, I'm getting interested again, I even bought some model mags the other day, might even read them, lol, instead of just looking at the pictures.

I've even started wondering about silly things that really don't matter that much, that's a good sign, things like the 'rain gutter' that can be found on the rear of some M4A1 cast hulls, It's called a rain gutter, but still no one seems have a clue what it was for, therefore I shall call it a puzzle, and ponder it endlessly...



Some hulls have it, and some hulls don't, there are some clues though, the exhausts are underneath that general area and I suppose the engine deck does need water drainage from the engine deck access plate which does sit in a lip, but 'rain gutter'? it just seems a little far fetched, but who knows...


M4A3E8Easy8
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Posted: Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 11:48 AM UTC
A blast from the past... Now go out to the shed and get your little blue knife from all the motor bike stuff and pick this one back up.
Kharkov
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Posted: Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 08:01 AM UTC


A good picture (above) showing the very distinctive drive sprocket used on the M4A1 Grizzly, in combination with the Canadian Dry Pin tracks, but more importantly, for this part of the build log, the picture highlights very well the 'big rib' bogies, showing the exact shape of the strengthening ribs.


More Options for Track and Bogies

Well, this is one option, Dragon released an updated Sexton kit that includes CDP (Canadian Dry Pin) tracks, the corresponding drive sprockets and the big rib bogies (I think), so it's an option for getting the running gear, it's an expensive option, but then a set of Friuls is not exactly cheap either to be honest.



Resicast Bogies

Resicast stole my bogies! (joking) Resicast now have a set of Sexton Heavy Bogies which should do the job nicely if you fancy going the resin route, they have three types available, listed as - flat, raised and angled return roller bracket, and they also give the option of not having the cutouts on the top face, which I didn't realise was an option, I thought all the big rib bogies had the cutouts, oh well, shows how little I know.







These pictures are taken from Resicast's website,

They look very nice, I will probably buy a set at some point just to have a look and see how they compare to mine, and if they are better (probably will be) I'll still use mine, because,..well, reasons, lol.


Anyway,

I've rebuilt the entire build log, so might start working on this again at some point soon™ I've applied for a trademark on soon™, then it will simply mean anytime in the future...





Matt
Kharkov
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Posted: Thursday, July 14, 2016 - 04:42 AM UTC

Quoted Text

any suggestions you can give would be helpful for me since I never really done much scratch building.



I'm not really sure that I'm the best person to be giving advice on scratch building to be honest, I tend to just mess around and not take things to seriously anymore with regards to model making, my main focus is to simply have fun with plastic, so that's my first bit of advice, always keep it fun, if the process of making whatever you are making is not fun, then don't make it, this is a hobby, not a job.

I don't tend to regard myself as a scratch builder, I tend to regard myself as an 'old school' model maker, that kinda thing, I just make things from white plastic sometimes to make them look pretty for a build log, as apposed to a scratch builder who would simply get on with the job and not worry too much about whether it all looks nice and clean, in effect that means that I waste far too much time on things that don't really matter.

But anyway, I can at least offer some basic advice on tools and stuff, basic things that help you get into cutting plastic card and just messing around having fun, making some basic things...

Tools n Stuff

For cutting plastic card...



Please, for the love of God use a scriber, it's a must have tool for all kinds of plastic card cutting, and for thick plastic sheet its simply the best and simplest way, you simply scribe a trench in the plastic by following a metal rule, and then go back and scribe the trench deeper (how deep tends to vary on personal preference) and then bend n snap the card, clean up the edge and it's job done.

They are a very cheap tool to buy, so there is no excuse for not having one, along side your knife it will quickly become one of your most used tools, they last almost forever, and come with spare blades, who could ask for more!

And it will put a groove in your work bench faster than you can say - "Shite, it's grooved my bench!" so never use a scriber to cut all the way through the plastic card, only go half, or at most three quarters of the way through, then bend n snap the card.


My Most Useful/Used Tools



1. A good knife, selection of knives, is also a must have in my book, I really don't like those cheap nasty things at all, these are Swann Mortons, they are stainless steel and a tad expensive, but the replaceable blades are very sharp and come in different sizes and shapes, your knife is your most used and useful modelling tool, so, get a good one.

2. Steel rule and some metal drawing tools (compasses) a steel rule is another must have, they get used all the time, hard to do anything really without one, both marking out and cutting. Drawing tools for marking out and also for cutting circles/curves, with two metal points they can be used very much like a scriber, to cut out a circle in plastic card, simply spin to win, it will scribe a circular trench, then pop the circle out.

3. Needle files and pin vices, again must have tools really, needle files are very good for cleaning up edges, shaping and re-shaping, PE work, all kinds of things, and pin vices for drilling little holes and holding small items while you work on them.

4. Small cutting saws, they come in various sizes and are very useful for getting you both in a mess, and out of a mess, a good emergency tool, and essential really for butchering plastic kits.


Scissors and Stuff...



5. Scissors and cutting snips, scissors can be useful for cutting very thin plastic card and metal sheet, but they will 'turn over' the edge as they cut, not always a problem, but can be sometimes, and my cutting snips tend to get used mostly as nibblers because I can't be bothered to buy some proper nibblers, also a basic modelling tool for cutting parts from the sprue.

6. Lots and lots of CA glue, I tend to use mostly a very thin type, this can then be fed into joints using capillary action to suck it into the joint, I tend to 'tack' joints with plastic cement, and then follow up with CA glue applied with a thin piece of wire, the glues are first pooled on a metal block, aluminium in this case.

7. It's handy to always keep and old piece of thick plastic card around to use as a cutting and drilling mat, and stick a little raised edge on it, that will let you in effect lock a piece of card that you are working on into place, very good for cleaning up edges.

8. And last but not least, a tool that is fast becoming one of my most used tools, a little metal square with some sandpaper stuck on the side, it gets used for a huge number of clean up jobs, and is very useful for cleaning up the edges of freshly cut plastic card, it will give you a nice clean square edge if used as in the previous picture, i.e. a sliding motion across the bench, this is why I use a hard top bench without one of those horrible green cutting mat things, that I hate with a passion.

Anything else useful to say...

Keep your bench clean and tidy! If you can't find anything, you can't build anything, I see so many pictures on modelling forums of work benches that are just a complete mess, but then I'm a bit of a tidy freak, and lastly, If you intend to post your work online, then at the very least try and keep the work clean, have some respect for your work, after all you spent all that time on it.


Anyway,




Matt
testpro
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Posted: Sunday, July 10, 2016 - 12:30 AM UTC
i am so happy I found this build. the scratch building is just, well what I dream of doing. So if you do not mind I plan on using this to repeat all or sum of the work you done here. I love adding detail but I suffer from the SQU's (pronounced screws) Self Queen Undone. But I have recently returned to the hobby (over the last several years) and now starting to really build things.
any suggestions you can give would be helpful for me since I never really done much scratch building.
the work is excellent and I hop I learn a lot. keep it up while I follow along in amazement and hopfully not frustrated but I find this fun. So carry on
Kharkov
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 06:16 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Welcome back... to you and snuggles. Hope you have gotten your bearings aligned and are progressing along. I have not forgotten the E8 waiting in the wings.



Well the new Tamiya M4A3E8 'Easy Eight' is fast becoming one of my all time favourite kits to be honest, very nice detail but with simplified suspension in terms of parts count and ease of construction, and still keeps good detail, plus it's a fairly cheap kit, making it good for 'mess around' projects where things tend to get butchered and modified a lot.

Anyway, I would like to put one together and then add some extra armour plates to the hull and turret, kinda like Dragons Thunderbolt kit, but without using a Dragon kit this time, my last Dragon Sherman kit ended up in the bin, harsh but justified, lol.


M4A3E8Easy8
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Posted: Friday, July 01, 2016 - 02:07 AM UTC
Welcome back... to you and snuggles. Hope you have gotten your bearings aligned and are progressing along. I have not forgotten the E8 waiting in the wings.
Kharkov
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Posted: Sunday, June 19, 2016 - 09:48 PM UTC
Cookie,

Thx, next update should be some work on the upper hull I think, I'm bored with the bogie work.


Purplepanzer,

All the measurements for the lower hull are taken from the standard Tasca/Asuka lower hull, which represents a riveted M4A1 hull, this Tasca hull was also checked with the drawings in Son of Sherman, it seemed to match up fairly well if I remember right, my hull simply represents a welded M4A1 hull, and needs to be the same (size wise) as the Tasca part so that it fits the Tasca upper hull.

The changes made to the suspension units, i.e. adding the new strengthening ribs (Grizzly/Sexton ribs) was simply done by guesswork, from looking at lots of reference pictures of the real thing, so not exact, but you can get feel for how big they need to be.

Purplepanzer
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Posted: Friday, June 17, 2016 - 02:17 AM UTC
Really, really impressive. Can I ask, where did you get all measurements etc. required for the build?
Cookiescool2
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Posted: Thursday, June 09, 2016 - 04:36 AM UTC
Wow I'm ecstatic that this build has returned, can't wait for the next update!