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Armor/AFV: Modern - USA
Modern Armor, AFVs, and Support vehicles.
Hosted by Darren Baker
Build Review SKP Kit 225 M1101/M1102 LTT
WXerock
#450
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California, United States
Joined: July 19, 2015
KitMaker: 418 posts
Armorama: 415 posts
Posted: Sunday, June 25, 2017 - 03:45 PM GMT+7
Introduction: Adapted from the olive-drab.com website: The Light Tactical Trailer, M1101/M1102 is a single axle, two wheel trailer designed to be towed by a HMMWV. The high ground clearance trailer consists of a cargo box mounted on the Light Tactical Trailer Chassis. The two types are:

-Trailer, Cargo: 2-Wheel, Light M1101
-Trailer, Cargo: 2-Wheel, Heavy M1102

The M1101 and M1102 trailers have the same tires, wheels, and track width as the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV). The Light Tactical Trailer for general cargo is designated by two model numbers, the M1101 and M1102, depending on its loading by weight. That is, there is no physical difference between the M1101 and the M1102 models, other than the dataplate. The two model numbers are used to regulate the Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW), based solely on the vehicle towing the trailer. For example, when the GVW does not exceed 3,400 pounds (1542 kg) the M1101 cargo trailer can be towed by a HMMWV M998/M1038 series prime mover. Both the M1101 and the M1102 trailer models can be towed by a HMMWV M1097/M1114.

Review: This will be my first build review of a resin kit here. I will be presenting the review in a few installments over the next few weeks. This is a true multi-media kit with parts in resin and photo etched brass. The kit comes packaged in a sturdy, light weight corrugated, top opening box with the parts in small zipper bags. The silver box has a color photo of the assembled and painted kit. The kit comes packaged in five zipper bags. The larger, flat parts are even packed with sheets of light weight corrugated board to ensure they stay flat.







The instructions are the nicest I have ever seen in a resin kit, in any kit for that matter. They are reminiscent of those produced by Eduard. Assembly is shown in 12 steps on 8 pages. Resin and photo etched parts are shown in different colors for clarity. Resin parts to be added in each step are shown in slate blue, photo etch parts in gold, and existing resin parts in gray. The instructions actually show mating surfaces where glue is to be applied in pink, which is a great feature. There is a two sided sheet of paper with a NATO three color scheme on one side and desert tan on the other. Colors are only listed as NATO olive green, NATO brown, NATO black and US Army sand. Decal placement is shown on the color guide.





















WXerock
#450
Visit this Community
California, United States
Joined: July 19, 2015
KitMaker: 418 posts
Armorama: 415 posts
Posted: Sunday, June 25, 2017 - 04:06 PM GMT+7
Installment 2: The kit is cast in a slate blue colored resin. There was no breakage and only one part detached from the pour blocks. The resin parts come on 19 pour blocks. The pour blocks on the large parts attach all along one edge and have small supports in a couple of places. These will require sanding all along one edge. There is some curve to all of the large parts which will require the application of gentle heat to flatten them. The smaller parts have small attachment points which should be easy to remove. There is a little flash on the openings of all of the small parts. In some cases this flash is thin and will be easy to remove, in others it will require a drill or careful removal with a knife.













There are two sheets of photo etched parts. The smaller of the two sheets is roughly twice the thickness of the larger sheet. The kit also features a complete set of SKP’s beautiful resin on metal colored lenses for the lights and reflectors. There is a 2.25” X 2.5” decal sheet included as well. There is a comprehensive set of stencils and data plates. There is the option to build the model in the towed or parked configurations. My kit was missing resin parts “C” which is the three marker lights that are mounted along the rear, bottom edge of the trailer.




WXerock
#450
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California, United States
Joined: July 19, 2015
KitMaker: 418 posts
Armorama: 415 posts
Posted: Monday, June 26, 2017 - 01:03 PM GMT+7
Installment 3:
Detail: The detail on this kit is fantastic. It places this kit on par with the best on the market by Legend and Live Resin. There is a fine texture on the parts similar to that on kits in plastic produced by Tamiya and Dragon. I have recently taken a large number of photos of an M1102 at my place of employment. This kit seems to capture all of the shapes and structures of the prototype perfectly. The kit appears to be well engineered, but doesn’t appear to be well executed once you start to dry fit the parts.

Assembly:
Step 1: This step starts assembly with just the trailer floor, fenders and floor tie downs. I prepped the resin parts at this point for steps 1 and 2 and performed all of the dry fitting for these steps. It is here that I discovered that while the kit is well planned out, the engineering of the parts is only just acceptable. The fenders and sides of the trailer need flat surfaces to mate to but once the pour plugs are removed, it is hard to figure out how much more material should be removed to expose the mating surface. There are small pips on the pieces that help to align the parts. None of the corresponding holes are shaped correctly, nor is there a corresponding hole at all for one of them. That said, on to assembly! After removing a ton of material along the edges of the floor and the fenders it was time to move on. Because I did a lot of prep I noticed that there was a step along the back edge of the floor when it should have been flat. If the step was left the rear wall wouldn’t have been able to sit straight up and down. The fenders required a bit of cyano glue run along the gap with the floor. I then added the photo etch tie downs to the floor. They can be bent easily so that one side or the other could be shown either folded flat or shown up for use. There is even a small grommet on the floor of the trailer where the wire for the tail lights passes through the floor. I drilled out the grommet and where the wiring attaches to the tail lights and the rear side marker light.







Next installment will be Step 2 and step 3.
Cookiescool2
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Georgia, United States
Joined: May 09, 2014
KitMaker: 256 posts
Armorama: 255 posts
Posted: Monday, June 26, 2017 - 01:34 PM GMT+7
Thanks for the detailed look, I'm looking forward to the next update!
WXerock
#450
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California, United States
Joined: July 19, 2015
KitMaker: 418 posts
Armorama: 415 posts
Posted: Saturday, July 15, 2017 - 04:12 PM GMT+7
Installment 4:
SKP works fast and already sent me resin parts “C” which turns out are cast in clear resin. This wasn’t entirely clear in the instructions. These photos are from Google Photos. My first attempt didn’t work so I had to make some adjustments and got them the photos to work. I hope this is a fix for Photobucket. It is behaving badly as most of you know.



Step 2: Sorry this took so long to post. I had some issues with this step that required a lot of cleanup and sanding. I am going to deviate from the instructions slightly by adding wiring for the taillights here. Other than wiring and brake lines, this will be an out of the box build. This step begins with adding all of the side walls to the floor. This is where most of the kit’s problems will occur. Most of the parts require very careful trimming to ensure the mating surfaces have a flat, square surface to mate with. The bed floor is slightly smaller than the mating surfaces which will leave a gap around the floor if not shimmed. Unfortunately I chose not to shim and instead trimmed the mating surfaces. This led to the sides being slightly too long. I had to trim the rear wall by almost 2mm which led to the mating surfaces not matching as well as they should have. While filing them I ruined the 45 deg angle of the mating surface so there was a gap that I had to correct. I didn’t realize this until I had one side already glued in place. I had to file off detail on the inside corners which I had to replace with styrene strips. The side walls lined up okay, but should also have been shortened slightly. Because I didn’t shorten the sidewalls, the short wall sections that go either side of the tailgate needed to be shimmed. All of this made for a complicated step 2! The alignment pins on the sides are useless and had to be removed. Some of the photo etch parts in steps 2 and 3 align with small pins on the resin parts. These pins are supposed to represent the fasteners that hold the parts onto the body. They are slightly too short for this.















Step 3: This step adds the top corners to the bed and the tailgate assembly. The resin parts that make up the corners of the bed went on easily. There was just some careful sanding required to ensure these parts went on flush and square. There are a couple of photo etch parts added to the tailgate here. The longer parts require a careful double fold that is best done after studying photos of the real thing. There is no way to judge how to fold these parts by using the instructions. The other two parts are tiny and if you aren’t careful, they will feed the carpet monster.









That’s it! Steps 2 and 3 are done. I have step 4 done and will upload it soon as installment 5.
WXerock
#450
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California, United States
Joined: July 19, 2015
KitMaker: 418 posts
Armorama: 415 posts
Posted: Saturday, July 15, 2017 - 04:55 PM GMT+7
Installment 5:
Step 4: In this step a lot of photo etch is added to the bottom. The base for the axle is also added in this step. The main photo etch pieces that attach on either side of the bottom front didn’t have the right overlap. I am not sure if this due to a mistake on my part or not. The resin axle bases fit very well once the alignment tabs were removed. They were useless and actually hindered placement of the parts.











This is the end of step 4. Step 5 looks like it will be an easy one and I’ll cover it in installment 6.
HermannB
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Bayern, Germany
Joined: October 14, 2008
KitMaker: 2,808 posts
Armorama: 2,782 posts
Posted: Saturday, July 15, 2017 - 05:51 PM GMT+7
Looks like a perfect kit?
WXerock
#450
Visit this Community
California, United States
Joined: July 19, 2015
KitMaker: 418 posts
Armorama: 415 posts
Posted: Saturday, July 15, 2017 - 06:24 PM GMT+7
Hans-Herman, it really is a good kit, but it is far from perfect. I've made some mistakes that I hope this review will help others to avoid. I am hoping that it will finish up into a great little model. I am going to take this all the way to a paint job. It sure does fill a void. I still hope someone, Bronco or Trumpeter, will make one in plastic.

Regards,

Eric
HermannB
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Bayern, Germany
Joined: October 14, 2008
KitMaker: 2,808 posts
Armorama: 2,782 posts
Posted: Saturday, July 15, 2017 - 08:48 PM GMT+7
Trumpeter should start with the M1095 MTVT.
WXerock
#450
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California, United States
Joined: July 19, 2015
KitMaker: 418 posts
Armorama: 415 posts
Posted: Monday, July 17, 2017 - 07:59 AM GMT+7
Hans-Hermann, at least there is already a model of a trailer suitable for towing behind the the FMTV trucks. There isn't a model of any trailer suitable for towing behind a HMMWV. You should be able to convert Trumpeter's M1082 LMTVT to an M1095. From photos it appears that it is just an M1082 with a second axle.

Regards,

Eric