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Armor/AFV: Axis - WWII
Armor and ground forces of the Axis forces during World War II.
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Operation sea lion amphibious equipment ?
bill_c
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Posted: Friday, March 08, 2019 - 05:21 AM UTC
Merci, H.P.

This is my point, Gents, the Germans didn't have a lot of transport ships, they were planning on using barges, which they had a TON of.

European commerce ran mostly on barges and by rail before the introduction of heavy trucks/lorries after the war. Germany simply lacked the naval tonnage to project a large force across even The Channel.
Frenchy
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Posted: Friday, March 08, 2019 - 03:57 AM UTC
I guess some of the pictured boats above are converted civilian barges, like these :









H.P.
GregCopplin
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Posted: Friday, March 08, 2019 - 03:33 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Some of you may remember this 2013 thread about German barges and landing-related stuff :

http://www.armorama.co.uk/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=214742

The problem with old threads is that some links may have died in the meantime...



Full size











This one is for Greg









Alinda Bay, Leros island : British prisoners of war assist in carrying wounded on to a waiting Pionierlandungsboot (1943)



H.P.



Almost looks as if they built the walls up on some of these barges and then cut an entrance out of the front !
Frenchy
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Posted: Friday, March 08, 2019 - 12:57 AM UTC
Some of you may remember this 2013 thread about German barges and landing-related stuff :

http://www.armorama.co.uk/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=214742

The problem with old threads is that some links may have died in the meantime...



Full size











This one is for Greg











Alinda Bay, Leros island : British prisoners of war assist in carrying wounded on to a waiting Pionierlandungsboot (1943)



H.P.
RobinNilsson
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Posted: Friday, March 08, 2019 - 12:54 AM UTC
But the Terrapin looked a lot better

The German thingy is just an ugly box on wheels
/ Robin
BootsDMS
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Posted: Thursday, March 07, 2019 - 11:56 PM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Just getting back to the equipment issue, I always imagined that amongst the Tauchpanzers, Landwasserschleppers, Sturmboote etc, there might be a few of these on the beaches:

https://www.elitemodell.de/elite/wehrmacht/3587/

about which I could find very little; I knew nothing about this vehicle until I visited the Elite Modellbau site.

While not perhaps as diverse as subsequent Allied specialised armour, the mix above and including this vehicle, is not uninteresting from not least, a What-If point of view.

Brian



Two chassis for an 8x8 configuration of Einheitsdiesel were built, at least one, maybe both, were turned into amphibians.


https://www.trucksplanet.com/catalog/model.php?id=669

The project was not continued, maybe because the payload was only 4 tons.

/ Robin



Thanks Robin; mind you, probably no better or worse than the British Terrapin.

Brian
RobinNilsson
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Posted: Thursday, March 07, 2019 - 11:24 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Just getting back to the equipment issue, I always imagined that amongst the Tauchpanzers, Landwasserschleppers, Sturmboote etc, there might be a few of these on the beaches:

https://www.elitemodell.de/elite/wehrmacht/3587/

about which I could find very little; I knew nothing about this vehicle until I visited the Elite Modellbau site.

While not perhaps as diverse as subsequent Allied specialised armour, the mix above and including this vehicle, is not uninteresting from not least, a What-If point of view.

Brian



Two chassis for an 8x8 configuration of Einheitsdiesel were built, at least one, maybe both, were turned into amphibians.


https://www.trucksplanet.com/catalog/model.php?id=669

The project was not continued, maybe because the payload was only 4 tons.

/ Robin
GregCopplin
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Posted: Thursday, March 07, 2019 - 11:02 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Reading all the remarks about the quality and amount of German sea transport, another very important factor for a successful invasion is air supremacy.
In Dutch and Belgian harbours in 1940 there was still quite some capacity available, being commercial ships which could be confiscated.
However, to create a beach head, air mobile units were an absolute must to secure the beach heads.
And here things have gone terribly wrong in spring 1940: the losses in air transport capacity during the invasion of the Lowlands (Belgium and The Netherlands) have been that high that on short term not sufficient transport planes were available.



You are correct air transport did take a hit, do you think they would have used HE-111 for airborne drops like they did during the Crete landings? Also how cool would it be to build a 1/35 or 1/48 gigant plane for a dio.
GregCopplin
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Posted: Thursday, March 07, 2019 - 11:01 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Just getting back to the equipment issue, I always imagined that amongst the Tauchpanzers, Landwasserschleppers, Sturmboote etc, there might be a few of these on the beaches:

https://www.elitemodell.de/elite/wehrmacht/3587/

about which I could find very little; I knew nothing about this vehicle until I visited the Elite Modellbau site.

While not perhaps as diverse as subsequent Allied specialised armour, the mix above and including this vehicle, is not uninteresting from not least, a What-If point of view.

Brian



That looks like a German DUKW. Kinda cool looking though! I would suspect that the GermNs would of used the Landwasser vehicles more and would have had more ingenious designs. I do like the idea of that dml kit with the two LWS and the ferrying barge though!
BootsDMS
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Posted: Thursday, March 07, 2019 - 10:16 PM UTC
Just getting back to the equipment issue, I always imagined that amongst the Tauchpanzers, Landwasserschleppers, Sturmboote etc, there might be a few of these on the beaches:

https://www.elitemodell.de/elite/wehrmacht/3587/

about which I could find very little; I knew nothing about this vehicle until I visited the Elite Modellbau site.

While not perhaps as diverse as subsequent Allied specialised armour, the mix above and including this vehicle, is not uninteresting from not least, a What-If point of view.

Brian
Paulinsibculo
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Posted: Thursday, March 07, 2019 - 07:47 PM UTC
Reading all the remarks about the quality and amount of German sea transport, another very important factor for a successful invasion is air supremacy.
In Dutch and Belgian harbours in 1940 there was still quite some capacity available, being commercial ships which could be confiscated.
However, to create a beach head, air mobile units were an absolute must to secure the beach heads.
And here things have gone terribly wrong in spring 1940: the losses in air transport capacity during the invasion of the Lowlands (Belgium and The Netherlands) have been that high that on short term not sufficient transport planes were available.
bill_c
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Posted: Thursday, March 07, 2019 - 12:19 PM UTC

Quoted Text

As has been posted before, the fleet the Germans calculated they would need had been fully assembled (and more) by September 19,1940. They were massively relying on civilian vessels, a bit like operation dynamo just a few months earlier.


All the information I have seen was about using river barges and coastal lighters. What ships did the Germans have that could have carried Sturmboote?
Bonaparte84
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Posted: Thursday, March 07, 2019 - 07:32 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I'm just skeptical of the notion of Germany having anything approaching transports from which to launch anything much at all.



As has been posted before, the fleet the Germans calculated they would need had been fully assembled (and more) by September 19,1940. They were massively relying on civilian vessels, a bit like operation dynamo just a few months earlier. Since it was part of the plan to conquer some ports intact, it probably played a lesser role that most of the vessels were not designed for amphibious landings. Getting the right number of vessels wasn't what troubled the Germans.
In any case, I don't understand the debate about the worthiness of the subject, with all the E-series tanks and paper tanks and Luftwaffe 46 and what not being modelled.
GregCopplin
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Posted: Thursday, March 07, 2019 - 07:04 AM UTC

Quoted Text

You could always scratchbuild one of the barges the Nazis were assembling for the invasion....



I was actually thinking of doing the front half of one
bill_c
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Posted: Thursday, March 07, 2019 - 03:49 AM UTC
You could always scratchbuild one of the barges the Nazis were assembling for the invasion....
GregCopplin
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Posted: Wednesday, March 06, 2019 - 11:14 PM UTC

Quoted Text

I have enjoyed all of the comments from the other Armorama readers! All of them were dead on right in the data. Just remember the entire Home Fleet would be on the way including all of their minesweepers. The Germans had few capital ships and maybe they would not want to loose them in the Channel. Please do not let me keep you from doing the diorama. I just wanted to point out the problems of Operation Sea Lion.



Don’t worry it won’t keep me from doing the diorama. I’m just trying to come up with an idea of what i want to do and how to execute it best. I’ve really enjoyed all the feedback I’ve received on this. I’m hoping to start this in the near future.
PzDave
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Posted: Wednesday, March 06, 2019 - 04:23 PM UTC
I have enjoyed all of the comments from the other Armorama readers! All of them were dead on right in the data. Just remember the entire Home Fleet would be on the way including all of their minesweepers. The Germans had few capital ships and maybe they would not want to loose them in the Channel. Please do not let me keep you from doing the diorama. I just wanted to point out the problems of Operation Sea Lion.
bill_c
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Posted: Wednesday, March 06, 2019 - 12:11 PM UTC

Quoted Text

... And, some of those materials were used in an "invasion" of sorts elsewhere -- in the Mediterranean during the movement of the Afrika Korps to Libya, where the Royal Navy was unable to effectively intervene (at first). So in reality, although it wasn't a truly amphibious operation, the Germans (along with their Italian allies) were able to move troops and equipment ashore effectively, across distances greater than the Channel.


The Afrika Korps was put across the sea in bunches, and initially was no more than the 5th Panzer Regiment, and later the 15th "Light" Division. There is simply no parallel to the need for OKW to project probably 100x that number of soldiers onto the beaches of England.

Quoted Text

The extremely unlikely fact of a German invasion of Britain with the Royal Navy largely intact does not invalidate the study of what a section of that landing might have looked like. At least to me. They certainly planned enough and practiced enough that it can be surmised.


I agree wholeheartedly.

Hitler was told the invasion of Russia was madness, yet he did so anyway. We have no way of knowing how things might have gone differently if that plucky band of pilots, groundcrews, spotters, plotters, radar operators and others hadn't punched der Fuehrer squarely in the nose. I'm just skeptical of the notion of Germany having anything approaching transports from which to launch anything much at all.
Pongo_Arm
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Posted: Wednesday, March 06, 2019 - 11:40 AM UTC
I agree, this is not a worthy topic for modeling and discussion because it was a good idea, but because they actually concieved of it and planned for it. So the what would have it looked like is interesting.
Frenchy
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Posted: Wednesday, March 06, 2019 - 08:57 AM UTC
Related article :

http://www.jmarkpowell.com/when-hitler-invaded-england-in-1974/

Looks like some German landings were on a budget





H.P.
Bravo1102
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Posted: Wednesday, March 06, 2019 - 03:58 AM UTC
Only declassified recently, the British put together numerous special resistance units. They were small cells widely spread out that would make life very difficult for the invaders.

Going back to the last successful invasions of England, Scotland and Wales it's not an easy place to conquer. Don't say Medieval versus modern operations are apples and oranges. Positional warfare, taking and holding land is very similar with artillery and air power being force multipliers but not changing the basic character of invading, taking and holding land.

Then there's just what the Royal Navy could have done in the Channel against an invasion fleet. A little air cover can go a long way. And I ve always believed that an actual invasion of Britain would have prompted American intervention because of FDR and Winston's relationship.

So just imagine US carriers flying off Wildcats covering the Royal Navy. FAA Martletts in North Africa regularly bested Me109's.
Dioramartin
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Posted: Wednesday, March 06, 2019 - 01:15 AM UTC
Hitler expected Britain to capitulate after Dunkirk and the “invasion” would actually have been an un-opposed, orderly and gradual ferrying over of occupation forces i.e. virtually bloodless (barring no doubt some guerrilla activity) as witnessed by the occupation of the Channel Islands. It would have been expressed as the British having “come to their senses” and “invited” the Germans to come over and “restore order”. The assembly of the Sealion amphibious operation served the purpose of maintaining pressure & kept a large number of now under-employed German forces busy for a couple of months while the Luftwaffe prepared the way for occupation by finishing off organised resistance. Some of the more practical vessels would likely have been used once the coast was literally clear.

As has been said, the failure to secure control of the skies, and therefore the English Channel, exposed the bluff of a seaborne assault. Equally as crucial as the RAF’s performance was the bizarre phenomenon of the BEF’s crushing defeat being represented as a glittering victory, giving Churchill the necessary overwhelming support needed to continue resistance. As he might have said, never in the field of human conflict had such an ignominious rout of so many paved the way for the largest successful amphibious invasion of all.
GregCopplin
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Posted: Wednesday, March 06, 2019 - 01:02 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

What if stuff. have to love it. The restriction on the invasion was air superiority. With out it, it was not going to work. (Hittler knew this)
With it... well now things are quite different. The British proved very nicely what capatal ships can do with out air cover in the Pacific. How well do you think all those british ships would have faired in the tight channel with german aircraft above them? Sure they may break up an invasion and sink a few transports, but at what cost to them? Not to mention those pesky U boats lurking around. Could the Royal Navy stop an invasion.. maybe. Could the Germans force the Royal Navy to turn tail and hide as they tired and land troops on England... Maybe. The one sure thing is the British Home Guard would not be able to hold those troops anywhere for very long at all. Remember they left all thier heavy weapons at Dunkirk awhile before. Hard to stop an armored attack with a rifle.



I'll second this post.

The first phase of battle of Britain was pretty much a war of attrition between the two air forces, and while the Luftwaffe had high losses, the RAF was hard-pressed as well. It isn't far-fetched at all that Germany could have forced the RAF to weaken their presence in the south, and so was the Birtish perception back then as well. Maybe not enough for the Germans to achieve air superiority, but possibly enough of a relief for an amphibious assault?

I don't know why this topic is being discussed so virulently, it is as close to reality a what-if scenario can ever get. I mean, the operation was in the books, troops and transports were being assembled and specific dates for the invasion debated. According to Wikipedia, by September 19 1940 a landing fleet of
- 168 freighters,
- 1975 barges,
- 100 coasters,
- 420 tugs and
- 1600 motor boats
had been assembled in the ports chosen as starting point. The armies to be embarked on that fleet were already/ still standing in France, Belgium and the Netherlands.

On a more technical note with regards to amphibious equipment, you might want to consider the Pz.III version modified as a diving tank. Here's a link to a build of the Dragon model (of course Dragon ):
https://www.panzer-bau.de/fahrzeugmodelle-1-35/kettenfahrzeuge-edw/tauchpanzer-iii/
And here the diorama:
https://www.panzer-bau.de/dioramen-1-35/fahrzeugdioramen-edw-1-35/baubericht-diorama-tauchpanzer-iii/
There are other actual pictures of such a tank around, e.g. here:
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/94/Bundesarchiv_Bild_101II-MW-5674-33%2C_Kanalküste%2C_Verladen_von_Tauchpanzer_III.jpg
They were supposed to be dropped off barges closer to the coast, a bit like the Allied deep wading tanks on D-Day. 168 tanks of different marks were modified that way, 80 of which were later succesfully used to cross the river Bug on the first day of operatio Barbarossa.

Cheers!

Edits: typos and such...



I’ve been looking at some of these, i think i could build the front of a barge and have a tauchpanzer begin wading to the beach in a dio while a sturmboots or two are approaching the beach. All justvmulling around in my head.

Also, has anyone read about the Aegean Sea battles. I just finished a book about them where the British attempted to hold a chain of islands and the Germans actually used amphibious landings and took the islands. They weren’t good at it but they were successful to an extent.
Bonaparte84
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Posted: Tuesday, March 05, 2019 - 11:39 PM UTC

Quoted Text

What if stuff. have to love it. The restriction on the invasion was air superiority. With out it, it was not going to work. (Hittler knew this)
With it... well now things are quite different. The British proved very nicely what capatal ships can do with out air cover in the Pacific. How well do you think all those british ships would have faired in the tight channel with german aircraft above them? Sure they may break up an invasion and sink a few transports, but at what cost to them? Not to mention those pesky U boats lurking around. Could the Royal Navy stop an invasion.. maybe. Could the Germans force the Royal Navy to turn tail and hide as they tired and land troops on England... Maybe. The one sure thing is the British Home Guard would not be able to hold those troops anywhere for very long at all. Remember they left all thier heavy weapons at Dunkirk awhile before. Hard to stop an armored attack with a rifle.



I'll second this post.

The first phase of battle of Britain was pretty much a war of attrition between the two air forces, and while the Luftwaffe had high losses, the RAF was hard-pressed as well. It isn't far-fetched at all that Germany could have forced the RAF to weaken their presence in the south, and so was the Birtish perception back then as well. Maybe not enough for the Germans to achieve air superiority, but possibly enough of a relief for an amphibious assault?

I don't know why this topic is being discussed so virulently, it is as close to reality a what-if scenario can ever get. I mean, the operation was in the books, troops and transports were being assembled and specific dates for the invasion debated. According to Wikipedia, by September 19 1940 a landing fleet of
- 168 freighters,
- 1975 barges,
- 100 coasters,
- 420 tugs and
- 1600 motor boats
had been assembled in the ports chosen as starting point. The armies to be embarked on that fleet were already/ still standing in France, Belgium and the Netherlands.

On a more technical note with regards to amphibious equipment, you might want to consider the Pz.III version modified as a diving tank. Here's a link to a build of the Dragon model (of course Dragon ):
https://www.panzer-bau.de/fahrzeugmodelle-1-35/kettenfahrzeuge-edw/tauchpanzer-iii/
And here the diorama:
https://www.panzer-bau.de/dioramen-1-35/fahrzeugdioramen-edw-1-35/baubericht-diorama-tauchpanzer-iii/
There are other actual pictures of such a tank around, e.g. here:
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/94/Bundesarchiv_Bild_101II-MW-5674-33%2C_Kanalküste%2C_Verladen_von_Tauchpanzer_III.jpg
They were supposed to be dropped off barges closer to the coast, a bit like the Allied deep wading tanks on D-Day. 168 tanks of different marks were modified that way, 80 of which were later succesfully used to cross the river Bug on the first day of operatio Barbarossa.

Cheers!

Edits: typos and such...
M4A3E8Easy8
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Posted: Tuesday, March 05, 2019 - 07:39 PM UTC
What if stuff. have to love it. The restriction on the invasion was air superiority. With out it, it was not going to work. (Hittler knew this)
With it... well now things are quite different. The British proved very nicely what capatal ships can do with out air cover in the Pacific. How well do you think all those british ships would have faired in the tight channel with german aircraft above them? Sure they may break up an invasion and sink a few transports, but at what cost to them? Not to mention those pesky U boats lurking around. Could the Royal Navy stop an invasion.. maybe. Could the Germans force the Royal Navy to turn tail and hide as they tired and land troops on England... Maybe. The one sure thing is the British Home Guard would not be able to hold those troops anywhere for very long at all. Remember they left all thier heavy weapons at Dunkirk awhile before. Hard to stop an armored attack with a rifle.