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Armor/AFV: Axis - WWII
Armor and ground forces of the Axis forces during World War II.
Hosted by Darren Baker
Panther Aus F wheels.
Catsrcool
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England - West Midlands, United Kingdom
Joined: December 04, 2018
KitMaker: 30 posts
Armorama: 30 posts
Posted: Tuesday, June 04, 2019 - 01:36 AM UTC
I have one of these kits:
https://www.scalemates.com/kits/dragon-6917-panther-ausff-w-night-sight-and-air-defense-armor--1140912
As far as I can tell in production the real thing would have had rubber rimmed wheels because the steel ones damaged the track.
Am I right please?
Frenchy
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Rhone, France
Joined: December 02, 2002
KitMaker: 12,468 posts
Armorama: 12,256 posts
Posted: Tuesday, June 04, 2019 - 01:51 AM UTC
According to Dragon's website :

"Steel-rimmed “silent bloc” wheels of 800mm diameter, which saved on dwindling supplies of rubber, were introduced in a very limited number of Panther Ausf.G produced by MAN in September 1944, and again in a batch dating from March-April of 1945 (introduced from chassis no. 121052). Such steel wheels had been successfully used on late-model Tiger I tanks and also on the Tiger II. These steel road wheels were also to be standardized on the updated Panther Ausf.F, a tank that never reached fruition."

H.P.
GeraldOwens
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Florida, United States
Joined: March 30, 2006
KitMaker: 3,620 posts
Armorama: 3,581 posts
Posted: Tuesday, June 04, 2019 - 10:48 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I have one of these kits:
https://www.scalemates.com/kits/dragon-6917-panther-ausff-w-night-sight-and-air-defense-armor--1140912
As far as I can tell in production the real thing would have had rubber rimmed wheels because the steel ones damaged the track.
Am I right please?


Walter Spielberger cited damage to the hollow track guide teeth as the reason that the experimental use of steel wheels on Panthers was halted in 1944. Panthers were supposed to resume use of steel wheels in May, 1945, but a new track design was also supposed to be used, with a single solid center guide on alternate links. This track was never developed, so it's anybody's guess what the Panther F would have used, had it entered production. The Daimler Benz factory outside Berlin was not known to have any steel wheels on hand when it was captured by the Russians in April, 1945. There were three incomplete Panther F hulls photographed on the assembly line. It's not known if any F turrets were present, and the factory was empty when American inspectors eventually arrived.
Thomas Jentz does not address any of this, so perhaps he doubted Spielberger's sources (he insisted on written documentation or physical examples to examine, and Spielberger may have relied on interviews).