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How to make a metal plate
barkingdigger
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ARMORAMA
#013
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England - East Anglia, United Kingdom
Joined: June 20, 2008
KitMaker: 3,574 posts
Armorama: 3,046 posts
Posted: Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 04:57 AM UTC
Charles shows us how to make rusty steel sheet from simple cardboard! Perfect for detailing all kinds of diorama, or adding loads to vehicles.

Link to Item



If you have comments or questions please post them here.

Thanks!
zorrolobo
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Distrito Federal, Mexico
Joined: May 31, 2013
KitMaker: 1,393 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 06:30 AM UTC
Nice work. very useful tutorial. Thank you Charles.
Braille
#135
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California, United States
Joined: August 05, 2007
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Posted: Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 07:08 AM UTC
@ti - Charles,

Thank you for sharing this easy to follow step-by-step technique for creating some very realistic rust effects on sheet cardboard.

~Eddy
Biggles2
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Quebec, Canada
Joined: January 01, 2004
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Posted: Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 11:11 AM UTC
Is there any advantage to using cardboard, or is it just because it is cheaper?
ti
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Dalarnas, Sweden
Joined: May 08, 2002
KitMaker: 2,203 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 08:50 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Nice work. very useful tutorial. Thank you Charles.



Thank you kindly. Glad it can be of use to some.
ti
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Dalarnas, Sweden
Joined: May 08, 2002
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Posted: Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 08:50 PM UTC

Quoted Text

@ti - Charles,

Thank you for sharing this easy to follow step-by-step technique for creating some very realistic rust effects on sheet cardboard.

~Eddy



Hi Eddy. My pleasure. Glad you approve.
ti
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Dalarnas, Sweden
Joined: May 08, 2002
KitMaker: 2,203 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 08:53 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Is there any advantage to using cardboard, or is it just because it is cheaper?



I can think of a some:

1. Cheap to come by. AKA, easily available.
2. light weight
3. Easy to work with, in terms of application.
4. Does not need a lot of tooling
pod3105
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Waterford, Ireland
Joined: August 08, 2010
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Posted: Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 09:36 PM UTC
Excellent, easy to follow tutorial. Thank you Charles.
ti
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Dalarnas, Sweden
Joined: May 08, 2002
KitMaker: 2,203 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 09:57 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Excellent, easy to follow tutorial. Thank you Charles.



Appreciate it.
11Bravo_C2
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Texas, United States
Joined: May 12, 2015
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Posted: Sunday, July 28, 2019 - 05:30 AM UTC
Simple yet effective. Will be using this in the future. Thanks!!
ti
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Dalarnas, Sweden
Joined: May 08, 2002
KitMaker: 2,203 posts
Armorama: 1,721 posts
Posted: Sunday, July 28, 2019 - 09:57 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Simple yet effective. Will be using this in the future. Thanks!!



Thank you kindly. Glad you found it useful.
JQuinn66
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Alabama, United States
Joined: August 15, 2019
KitMaker: 1 posts
Armorama: 1 posts
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2019 - 01:52 PM UTC
The markings you see could be hand written in usually white or yellow paint stick, and may be the plate identity or tracking number, a heat number, order number, grade of steel, and maybe the gauge/thickness and also length x width.
Some places may line mark that information down the length of the plate, with what is essentially an inkjet printer (or some places use a set of stencils on a wheel - thatís old school)
Or there might also be a printed tag/sticker attached to an end with ID/Heat/grade and probably some bar code.

Not all plates would be scaled up and rusty. Stainless steel or other specialty metal plates like nickel or titanium alloys would be pickled clean, and would be somewhat shiny, or even ground and would be very shiny and clean.
If itís regular carbon steel and fresh off the rolling mill, I think the metal with have a more blue/gray coloration from the mill scale/oxide. If they sit out for a long time the oxide/rust will grow and it becomes the red/brown.
And plated unless they are belt ground are rarely totally smooth. There will be some pits (would be small in most models), there could be some firecrack pattern from the rolls that may repeat - many other things get transferred from the rolls or vacuum lifters etc.
ti
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Dalarnas, Sweden
Joined: May 08, 2002
KitMaker: 2,203 posts
Armorama: 1,721 posts
Posted: Thursday, August 15, 2019 - 01:52 AM UTC

Quoted Text

The markings you see could be hand written in usually white or yellow paint stick, and may be the plate identity or tracking number, a heat number, order number, grade of steel, and maybe the gauge/thickness and also length x width.
Some places may line mark that information down the length of the plate, with what is essentially an inkjet printer (or some places use a set of stencils on a wheel - thatís old school)
Or there might also be a printed tag/sticker attached to an end with ID/Heat/grade and probably some bar code.

Not all plates would be scaled up and rusty. Stainless steel or other specialty metal plates like nickel or titanium alloys would be pickled clean, and would be somewhat shiny, or even ground and would be very shiny and clean.
If itís regular carbon steel and fresh off the rolling mill, I think the metal with have a more blue/gray coloration from the mill scale/oxide. If they sit out for a long time the oxide/rust will grow and it becomes the red/brown.
And plated unless they are belt ground are rarely totally smooth. There will be some pits (would be small in most models), there could be some firecrack pattern from the rolls that may repeat - many other things get transferred from the rolls or vacuum lifters etc.



Appreciate the extra info. Thank you kindly.