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Revell 1/25 Roush IMSA Trans Am JPS Mustang
Joel_W
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Posted: Monday, December 09, 2019 - 01:40 AM UTC
Russell,
Thanks for your most positive post. Yep, she's finally starting to look like the winner that she was on the track. Slowly but surely I'm inching closer to the finish line.

Next up is the drivers compartment.

Joel
RussellE
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Posted: Monday, December 09, 2019 - 08:32 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Russell,
Thanks for your most positive post. Yep, she's finally starting to look like the winner that she was on the track. Slowly but surely I'm inching closer to the finish line.

Next up is the drivers compartment.

Joel



Looking forward to seeing what you do there Joel
Joel_W
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Posted: Monday, December 09, 2019 - 08:46 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Russell,
Thanks for your most positive post. Yep, she's finally starting to look like the winner that she was on the track. Slowly but surely I'm inching closer to the finish line.

Next up is the drivers compartment.

Joel



Looking forward to seeing what you do there Joel



Russell,
Me too !!
Joel_W
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Posted: Sunday, December 22, 2019 - 06:32 AM UTC
Well, work on the Roush Mustang has been preceeding at a slower pace then usual, but honestly my days of modeling 5+ days/week since I've retired has come to an end for the time being. It just started to feel more like a job then a hobby, which I looked forward to, when I'm at my bench. I do have a few other interests, so I just decided to slow it down to about 3 days per week, and that seems to be about right for now. My Mojo levels have increased even though I've been fighting the good fight with this Revell kit. So far I'd say that I'm winning the war (just barely), but it sure hasn't been an easy fight for an old man my age.

Since my last update I finished up the engine compartment with the addition of the exhaust cross over pipe. As I said in my last update I had come to the conclusion that unless I left the motor out, there's no more room for any additional lines. Just the air cleaner needs to be glued in place, but 1st I have to paint it. So my focus now turned to the drivers compartment.

And here is where Revell has made another regroup, and counter attacked with all that this kit has. The front engine bulkhead just didn't fit as it's to wide. That's a combination of my NOT gluing the side frames exactly as they should be, but the fit was pretty sloppy so one has to guess. I just guessed slight wrong. So out came the files and various sandpapers. Finally it fits. Then I realized that the transmission cover needs to be installed 1st. So I dry fitted it, and then the battle really started in earnest. I just couldn't get the bulkhead to slide into position. Now this went on for two days, finally I figured that if I just dry fitted the cover, then tapped it so that the front was pulled up, the bulkhead would fit with a little persuasion. A few more dry fittings convinced me that it would work, so I glued the front builkhead in place with 5 min epoxy, but I didn't glue the transmission cover as I needed to be able to lift it again to get the dash in.



Next up was the dash, but not the instrument panel which is separate. Of course it didn't come close to fitting. So major surgery was needed to the sub structure that would go under the transmission cover, as well as narrowing it's width. Another day at the bench and it to was in place.



In between I hand painted all the instruments on the dash panel as there is no decal alternative in the kit, and I don't have any extras lying around close to the sizes I needed. The faces are supposed to be black with white numbers, but I opted to reverse them to add a little much needed color contrast. The bezels were painted with good old Testors Silver. The instrument panel slides right into place which was a very pleasant surprise. I left the steering wheel off for now.

The seat was painted a combination of Matt Black and Nato Black. Then epoxied into place. Now came the dreaded 6 way seatbelt/Harness time. One really needs a steady hand and good eyesight to build the HGW set. Unfortunately, neither of which I have. Somehow, I managed to get them built over the next few days. I adjusted the lengths of each belts as needed. I'm pretty happy with how they look. Not perfect, but gets the job done, especially as once the window netting is on, you really can't see much of the seat.



And finally the steering wheel was glued into place. I did paint the wheel Nato Black to represent the foam type cover on the wheel.

Still plenty to do including the fuel filters and lines, as well as replacing the two temp line straps in the trunk area. Of course I have to figure out a better alternative to the massively oversized window netting. And I'm looking forward to the wheels/tires so that the chassis can finally stand on it's own.













Joel
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Posted: Sunday, December 22, 2019 - 08:47 AM UTC
Hi Joel,

Despite the kitís ongoing effort to halt you in your tracks, youíre sure making great progress! Itís too bad the fit issues are showing up on such prominent and important parts....it must be driving you nuts! Hassles or not, you seem to be conquering them. If you hadnít said something, we wouldnít have known - congrats on keeping the whole package tight. I like your subtle mixing of shades of black. I remember you did something similar with shades of silver some time ago on a Porsche engine - looked great then too.

For the window netting, you might try making it out of thin sheet lead foil glued into a grid with CA, the kind you can get from the top seal on a wine bottle. Iíve used this method for making cargo nets for armored vehicles. You can prime and paint the home made screen, and it will remain flexible enough to contour glue into the kit. If you want to get fancy (and drive yourself crazy) you can add thin metal rods on the top and bottom for mounting hardware. This actually isnít that hard to do. You can run the vertical strips long, just past the length you want, and then fold the long runs back over themselves with the metal rod sandwiched in - sort of like a hinge. No, Iím not suggesting you basket weave the foil strips!!

You nailed the drivers seat and harness too!

Looking forward to seeing the fuel lines and the top of the engine!

Cheers
Nick
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Posted: Sunday, December 22, 2019 - 10:30 AM UTC
Joel, you are doing an awesome job with a kit that is fighting you all the way! It is the curse for us car modelers that that vast majority of our beloved subject matter is not available in new mould or new technology kits, so we fight the good fight on almost every build.

I actually enjoy the challenge and the satisfaction at the end where you have a completed build on display is just that little bit sweeter, but once in a while it is good to work through a build that basically just falls together and the stress levels are lowered at the bench.

The thing is, and as Nick said, if you weren't giving us such a detailed blow-by-blow call of the fight, we would have no idea of the troubles that you are encountering. The photos just show us a finely detailed, beautifully assembled work in progress.

Looking forward to the next round.

Cheers, D
Joel_W
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Posted: Monday, December 23, 2019 - 07:11 AM UTC
Nick,
Thanks so much for your really positive feedback. With my new 3 days per week my Mojo levels are rising daily. I'm determined to get my Roush 'Stang a course the finish as originally intended.

Really glad you liked how the 6 way harness came out.

Joel
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Posted: Monday, December 23, 2019 - 07:19 AM UTC
D,
Thanks for the super support. Actually sharing my tale of woe with you guys gives me that little extra to move find a way to solve every issue, and move ahead.

Gotta agree that many of my "must have builds" are ancient kits, but like you said, it's that or nothing. Time has passed them by, and unlike WWII aircraft kits, the odds of seeing most of them remolded and issued isn't to high. Even Ebbro has cut back on the 1960's run of F1 cars that I grew up with.

Having both you and Nick in my corner really means quite a lot to me.

Joel
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Posted: Thursday, December 26, 2019 - 09:17 PM UTC
Some super excellent detailing Joel! There is interest in every part from front to back and great skill. I understand your pain with the seat belts have just completed four sets for the Escorts.

cheers
Michael
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Posted: Thursday, December 26, 2019 - 10:36 PM UTC
Just amazing work on the details Joel!

You're decision to just spend 3 days a week on the bench has really paid off with quality over quantity!
Joel_W
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Posted: Friday, December 27, 2019 - 01:43 AM UTC
Michael,
Thanks for the thumbs up, as it's always greatly appreciated. And yeah that harness was rather a taxing affair mostly because I struggled with even my Optivisor to clearly see what the heck I was doing. I'm hoping that new bi-focals and prescription computer/reading/modeling glasses will really be a huge help in the new year.

Joel
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Posted: Friday, December 27, 2019 - 01:51 AM UTC
Russell,
You're always right there in my corner with positive comments that keep me focused and moving forward.

The 3 day max for building seems to be the right balance that I need to stay focused and look forward to each building session.

Retirement is kind of weird in that you can easily find yourself having to much free time with nothing much to do other then the same things over and over again, so the Mojo level goes down as I tended to just go through the motions at times, or put tough modeling jobs off. But now that I've got two hobbies both related to racing, so I'm always looking forward to both. And once the nicer weather arrives, there's the up keep of my Sports Coupe as well.

The holiday season has really put a major crimp in my modeling, but at our age we don't do much of anything for New Year's other then a kiss and huge, then turn in for the 1st night sleep of the New Year.

I'm really starting to look forward to my next build, which I haven't the slightest idea of what it will be, but one thing for sure, it won't be another Revell Tin top for some time to come.

Joel
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Posted: Monday, December 30, 2019 - 06:03 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Russell,
You're always right there in my corner with positive comments that keep me focused and moving forward.

The 3 day max for building seems to be the right balance that I need to stay focused and look forward to each building session.

Retirement is kind of weird in that you can easily find yourself having to much free time with nothing much to do other then the same things over and over again, so the Mojo level goes down as I tended to just go through the motions at times, or put tough modeling jobs off. But now that I've got two hobbies both related to racing, so I'm always looking forward to both. And once the nicer weather arrives, there's the up keep of my Sports Coupe as well.

The holiday season has really put a major crimp in my modeling, but at our age we don't do much of anything for New Year's other then a kiss and huge, then turn in for the 1st night sleep of the New Year.

I'm really starting to look forward to my next build, which I haven't the slightest idea of what it will be, but one thing for sure, it won't be another Revell Tin top for some time to come.

Joel



Even at my age, Joel, I find New Year's overrated
Joel_W
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Posted: Thursday, January 09, 2020 - 12:27 PM UTC
Been about two weeks since my last update. Of course those two weeks included Christmas and New Years, but I still managed to stick to my 3 day work week. Well, more of less.

Decided to switch gears, leaving the last of the drivers, engine, and rear compartments for a well needed break. So I turned my attention to the four wheels and tires. Now how hard could they possibly be? I should have known that the Revell Roush JPS Mustang still had some real fight left, as it seems that it's going to fight me all the way to the bitter end.

The tires are on a separate tree made out of some really hard as nails rubber. I can certainly live with that, but it's the molding that struck the 1st offensive blow of this battle. Seems that the molds leak a little, and they don't correctly align. That left me with both the usual center seam, and a slight step from one side of the seam to the other. Add to that the tires each have a sprue arm dead on center into the seam. Again, I can live with that resulting nub, but the attachment point actually is slightly below the surface.



There's no using any type of filler for sure. So out came every grit of emerycloth I have plus some wood working files. I finally got rid of most of the seam which is prototypical, and gone are those nubs and depressions.



The tires still need to be cleaned up some, but you can get the general idea.

I had to decide if I wanted to use metal stencils or decals for the Goodyear logos. I opted for decals as properly applied, they do look rather good. I bought 1/25 scale Goodyear tire logos from Indy Cals pre 1981 as well as post 1981, but never gave it much thought as to why the 1981 break. But more on that in a few. 1st I had to gloss the side walls. This is the only application that I still use Pledge for by brush no less. I applied a even wet coat on the back sidewall, as the front side had the name in raised letters, and I've never gotten them to look good enough needing multiple coats of white over primer, Then cleaning up any screw ups with a toothpick. So I just reversed the tire sidewalls. I gave the Pledge two full days to dry and cure.



Then came the fun decal part. Indy Cal sheets are all one super big decal, so I have to cut each decal out from the blue backing paper which was EXTREMELY difficult for me to see under a bright tensor light, but very slowly I got it done. Then trim with a new #10 Exacto blade.

Now back to the imfamous 1981 issue. Once again I didn't really check my references as I should have, and started with one rear tire. With the way that the decals are laid out on the sheet you get all the Goodyears in pairs. So I applied two Goodyear logo decals on the 1st sidewall using my decaling method of Micro Set, Micro Sol, and Solvaset, giving each solution 1 min to work it's magic before touching them. Worked great. Then I noticed that the sheet had the year pre-1981 on it, but my build is post 1981. A guick Google check to confirm this, and sure enough Goodyear started to use the name EAGLE in 1981. So back into my decal box for Indy Cars to see what I had screwed up. And sure enough I had totally forgotten that I had multiple tire logo sheets from Indy Cals, and one was for 1/25 scale POST 1981 with GOODYEAR & EAGLE on it in pairs. So I just rewet the 2nd Goodyear logo and removed it. But if I thought that the Goodyear logos were hard to cut out and trim, they're a piece of cake compared to the two different sizes of EAGLE logos. But finally I got them cut out and ready to apply. Took a while but all four tires were decaled.



The following day I air brushed on a coat of Alcad2 Semi Matte as I wanted to tires to look more like used tires that were cleaned along with the car rather then new tires.



Tires done, so it's back to the wheels. They came in the kit with some overly done chrome, so I just stripped them in Denatured Alcohol. Just a lovely shade of bright Red. You'll notice that the BBS wheel inserts have next to no depth to fool ones eye of the open spaces.



I primed them with Mr. Hobby Light Gray #1500 primer thinned 1:1 with their #400 leveling thinner. Waited a few hours, then I applied several lite coats of Tamiya X-1 Gloss Black. Gave that 2 full days to dry and cure.



Then I decided to air brush on Alad2 Chrome as it has a kind of polished look to it, but not like polished Chrome. Next work session I hand painted the middle of the wheel with a custom mix of Mr. Color Gold & Bronze as neither color looked right. Gave that a day to really dry, then working with a very thin brush, I carefully dabbed on Tamiya Black panel line wash into the recesses, and then cleaned off any that I got on the wheel with a damp Q tip using Mineral Spirits.



Gave the wheels a few days to cure and then pushed them into place 1st on the rears and added the back half of the wheels which I also air brushed with Alcad2 Chrome. Nice tight fit. Then the front wheels, and wouldn't you just know it, the wheels wouldn't fit no matter how much force I used. So out came some #320 Emerycloth and a few jeweler files. Eventually I got them into place, but it was a struggle.



The finished wheels still need a final cleaning, but I'm really happy how they turned out. Lets hope that they actually will fit on to the press fit ends of the Axles after the the body shell is glued into place.

Thanks to all for checking out my build to date, it's always much appreciated.

Joel







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Posted: Friday, January 10, 2020 - 02:22 AM UTC
Looking great Joel. Again, would never have known you were struggling with it as the results are pretty spectacular.

Back when I was building a lot of NASCAR I made a mandrel from an old wheel and with the center drilled out and a screw and nut. I slip the tire on and chuck it into the drill press on one of the lowest speeds. Files and sanding sticks make short work of seams and those horrible steps in Revell tires.
Joel_W
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Posted: Friday, January 10, 2020 - 03:31 AM UTC
David,
Thanks for your thumbs up, it's always greatly appreciated. My biggest concern was the wheels as I didn't want to start looking for AM substitutes. The relief in the wheels really is about a min as Revell could have designed and yet have some kind of visual shape to them. Fortunately, my plan worked well enough to pull it off.

I keep on promising myself to make some kind of mandrel that I can lock into the chuck of a drill to sand down these type of Golden Era tires. I'm sure that your method would have made short order of what took me a few days to accomplish.

Joel
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Posted: Friday, January 10, 2020 - 05:01 AM UTC
I just dread when there is a current generation F1 kit made with the glossy casing Pirellis. It will be nearly impossible to get them prepped to be unused.
Joel_W
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Posted: Friday, January 10, 2020 - 06:00 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I just dread when there is a current generation F1 kit made with the glossy casing Pirellis. It will be nearly impossible to get them prepped to be unused.



David,
Actually, it's the exact opposite. Assuming we're dealing with a rubber type tire, it's super easy to get the sidewalls and slick tread to a high gloss. I've tried air brushing several clear gloss finishes, all need multiple coats, and some just never get it right, plus at least for me, I got a lot of Orange Peel. But hand brushing with a wide brush apply enough Pledge so that one or at most two passes covers a section at a time. The more passes over a wet section just makes the surface harder for the Pledge to self level. You'll see it self level in just seconds. Let it dry for a full 24 hrs. and you're ready to go.

Joel
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Posted: Friday, January 10, 2020 - 01:05 PM UTC
I was thinking more about discoloration due to sanding the surface, but I'll give it a try at some point.
Joel_W
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Posted: Saturday, January 11, 2020 - 02:17 AM UTC
David,
I sand rubber tires all the time to remove casting imperfections. If you're just concerned about glossing the tires, then just prep with ISO Alcohol. For sanding, I use the same process as I do on plastics. I try to start no courser then #400, but will use #320 if I have to as I let the paper do the work, not by pushing down very hard. Then #600, 800, 1,000, 1,500, & 3,000. Then Pledge, and you can see in the pictures how the tires turned out.

As for color shift, it's just like plastic. Sanding causes the color to look muted and grayish. ISO Alcohol when done helps, but the Pledge restores the rich Black color.

Joel
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Posted: Saturday, January 11, 2020 - 10:55 AM UTC
Hi Joel -Iím still lurking in the shadows and keeping an eye on you . The tire/wheel package looks first rate . Keep at it . Hope you and yours had a happy holiday season.
Cheers - Richard
Joel_W
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Posted: Sunday, January 12, 2020 - 05:31 AM UTC
Richard,
And a Happy New Year to you and your family. Every time I see the program "The Pickers" where they love to buy old motorcycles and parts, I always think of you. So how's the bike progressing these days. I'm hoping that the engine, transmission, and clutches are all back together, and fully operational.

Thanks for the thumbs up on the wheels and tires. I used the Alcad2 Semi Matte clear, and after 5 days the surface is still sticky, so it will be heading to the recycling center this week, and it's back to my old time 1st love: Testors Dullcoat and Glosscoat.

Joel
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Posted: Sunday, January 12, 2020 - 01:50 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Thanks for the thumbs up on the wheels and tires. I used the Alcad2 Semi Matte clear, and after 5 days the surface is still sticky, so it will be heading to the recycling center this week, and it's back to my old time 1st love: Testors Dullcoat and Glosscoat. Joel



Joel, I never read anything good about the Alclad Clear products, with the exception of AquaGloss. The universal concensus seems to be that it just doesn't cure, so I think you are making the right decision to move it on away from the bench!

Cheers, D
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Posted: Sunday, January 12, 2020 - 05:49 PM UTC
Hi Joel,
Though it only takes 5 mins to read your post on the wheels and hubs I think we can all appreciate the work you have put into those parts. The outcome is superb and it is efforts like yours that always make me rethink my approach to various parts of a build. So keep up the descriptive work on the blog!

And I agree with Damian on the Alclad clear coats. I have four different versions but the AquaGloss is the only one I use now.

cheers
Michael
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Posted: Monday, January 13, 2020 - 04:33 AM UTC

Quoted Text



Joel, I never read anything good about the Alclad Clear products, with the exception of AquaGloss. The universal concensus seems to be that it just doesn't cure, so I think you are making the right decision to move it on away from the bench!

Cheers, D



D,
I've read that several times as well, but I still went ahead with the hope of finding a non-lacquer based Clear specifically as a neutral coating for Metallics. Well, as you pointed out, this stuff sure isn't.

I've just tested an old bottle Testor's ModelMaster Sealer for Metallics, and it works exactly as I wanted it to.

Joel