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Figures
Military figures of all shapes and sizes.
Ustashas
long_tom
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Illinois, United States
Joined: March 18, 2006
KitMaker: 2,129 posts
Armorama: 1,779 posts
Posted: Friday, November 08, 2019 - 01:14 PM UTC
I do have the Osprey book on WW2 partisans, and it mentions the Ustasha militia, and at least at the outset they had Italian uniforms. Was all their material Italian-provided? I'm unsure about doing research because I suspect most of the material about them is uncertain propaganda.
joepanzer
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North Carolina, United States
Joined: January 21, 2004
KitMaker: 714 posts
Armorama: 664 posts
Posted: Friday, November 08, 2019 - 01:53 PM UTC
Gesundheit
southpier
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Alberta, Canada
Joined: December 11, 2009
KitMaker: 443 posts
Armorama: 264 posts
Posted: Friday, November 08, 2019 - 02:16 PM UTC

Quoted Text

… I suspect most of the material about them is uncertain propaganda.



that's what makes research so fun. separating [auto-censored] from shinola!
PzDave
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United States
Joined: November 28, 2012
KitMaker: 306 posts
Armorama: 273 posts
Posted: Friday, November 08, 2019 - 05:53 PM UTC
No, they deserved everything written about them.
Paulinsibculo
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Overijssel, Netherlands
Joined: July 01, 2010
KitMaker: 1,268 posts
Armorama: 1,186 posts
Posted: Friday, November 08, 2019 - 09:41 PM UTC
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ustashe
long_tom
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Illinois, United States
Joined: March 18, 2006
KitMaker: 2,129 posts
Armorama: 1,779 posts
Posted: Saturday, November 09, 2019 - 06:24 AM UTC
And guess who ended up being the villains in the former Yugoslavia in the 1990's. What bitter irony.
Paulinsibculo
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Overijssel, Netherlands
Joined: July 01, 2010
KitMaker: 1,268 posts
Armorama: 1,186 posts
Posted: Saturday, November 09, 2019 - 07:14 AM UTC

Quoted Text

And guess who ended up being the villains in the former Yugoslavia in the 1990's. What bitter irony.



Certainly this is not the right place to discuss politics.
Therefore I suggest, having done several mission in BiH, as an NL Army officer in SFOR, IFOR and the ECMM, that this remarks should be considered as both not correct and not in place.....
BiH‘s history is far more complex to state simple things.
I suggest to stop any political discussion at once.
jphillips
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Arizona, United States
Joined: February 25, 2007
KitMaker: 1,039 posts
Armorama: 765 posts
Posted: Saturday, November 09, 2019 - 07:41 AM UTC
I'm not surprised to hear that the Ustasha wore Italian uniforms and I imagine you could use Italian figures to represent them. Italy and Croatia contested some territories and didn't much like each other but did cooperate against the Allies, and the Croatians received Italian-made aircraft, vehicles and small arms. After 1943 the Germans turned over a lot of stuff seized from the Italians. According to some accounts the Ustasha (party militia) were made part of the regular Croatian armed forces in September 1944.
iguanac
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Belgrade, Serbia & Montenegro
Joined: September 06, 2007
KitMaker: 125 posts
Armorama: 112 posts
Posted: Saturday, November 09, 2019 - 08:31 AM UTC
There is an Osprey book covering axis forces. Google images can be helpful. Ustashe were far right corps of a puppet nazi state of Croatia: generally, recruited "Domobrans" (home guard), wore khaki uniforms, whereas Ustashe (something as SS) wore black ones. Tailored very similar to Bulgarian uniforms. Also, it is not a politics if historical revisionism is taking place in Balkans,and that now days Croatia is full of Ustashe graffiti and their salute -"za dom spremni" written in the memorial ground where Ustashe had concentration camp for Serbs, Jews and Roma.
Usually, I'd stay out of such a modelling subjects, unless with a critical perspective, yet, people tend to model SS troops,so...
long_tom
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Illinois, United States
Joined: March 18, 2006
KitMaker: 2,129 posts
Armorama: 1,779 posts
Posted: Saturday, November 09, 2019 - 08:48 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

And guess who ended up being the villains in the former Yugoslavia in the 1990's. What bitter irony.



Certainly this is not the right place to discuss politics.
Therefore I suggest, having done several mission in BiH, as an NL Army officer in SFOR, IFOR and the ECMM, that this remarks should be considered as both not correct and not in place.....
BiH‘s history is far more complex to state simple things.
I suggest to stop any political discussion at once.


I brought it up only to indicate that the Serbians were not all devils nor the other side angelic.
jphillips
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Arizona, United States
Joined: February 25, 2007
KitMaker: 1,039 posts
Armorama: 765 posts
Posted: Saturday, November 09, 2019 - 09:59 AM UTC
I brought it up only to indicate that the Serbians were not all devils nor the other side angelic.

Nedic's collaborationist regime had a fighting formation too, called the Serbian State Guard, said to have been very effective at counter-insurgency tasks. Nedic justified his repression by telling his people that if Partisan activity wasn't stopped the puppet regime would be abolished and Serbia would become part of Croatia. I believe they were issued prewar Yugoslavian uniforms and gear. As far as I know these Serbian troops never served outside their own country. The Germans probably didn't fully trust them.
I have the Osprey book Marko mentioned; it's pretty good.
long_tom
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Illinois, United States
Joined: March 18, 2006
KitMaker: 2,129 posts
Armorama: 1,779 posts
Posted: Saturday, November 09, 2019 - 11:08 AM UTC

Quoted Text

There is an Osprey book covering axis forces. Google images can be helpful. Ustashe were far right corps of a puppet nazi state of Croatia: generally, recruited "Domobrans" (home guard), wore khaki uniforms, whereas Ustashe (something as SS) wore black ones. Tailored very similar to Bulgarian uniforms. Also, it is not a politics if historical revisionism is taking place in Balkans,and that now days Croatia is full of Ustashe graffiti and their salute -"za dom spremni" written in the memorial ground where Ustashe had concentration camp for Serbs, Jews and Roma.
Usually, I'd stay out of such a modelling subjects, unless with a critical perspective, yet, people tend to model SS troops,so...


The SS troops overall consisted mostly of ordinary soldiers (and many non-German ones) and only part of them were the truly horrible ones, such as the Dirlewanger and Kaminsky brigades...which were hated and feared even by the rest of the SS.