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Armor/AFV: Modern - USA
Modern Armor, AFVs, and Support vehicles.
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M110 203mm SP no longer in US service?
m60a3
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Georgia, United States
Joined: March 08, 2002
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Posted: Monday, September 30, 2002 - 10:17 PM UTC
Read on a website that the 8" was no longer in service. Is that true? Is it just Arcive, or Guard/Reserve too? What is the replacement weapon system?
Ranger74
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Tennessee, United States
Joined: April 04, 2002
KitMaker: 1,290 posts
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Posted: Monday, September 30, 2002 - 10:26 PM UTC
The 8" howitzers have been replaced by MLRS throughout the US Army.
Sabot
Joined: December 18, 2001
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Posted: Tuesday, October 01, 2002 - 03:29 PM UTC
Been gone since the end of the Gulf War.
shiryon
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New York, United States
Joined: April 26, 2002
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Posted: Tuesday, October 01, 2002 - 04:04 PM UTC
were M107s retired at the same time?

Josh Weingarten
aKa shiryon
matt
Staff MemberCampaigns Administrator
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New York, United States
Joined: February 28, 2002
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Posted: Tuesday, October 01, 2002 - 10:08 PM UTC
I believe Most 107's were converted to 110's During / After Vietnam.


Matt
shiryon
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New York, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, October 02, 2002 - 01:35 AM UTC
Interesting, I think it's the exact opposite with Israel the last vehicles in service were the M107s

Josh Weingarten
aKa shiryon :-)
salt6
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Oklahoma, United States
Joined: February 17, 2002
KitMaker: 774 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, October 02, 2002 - 01:46 AM UTC
Now I know why you see all these on display as war memorials. We have one in a small town about 30 minutes from here. Guess I'll have to go and get some pic.
matt
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New York, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, October 02, 2002 - 04:12 AM UTC
I read the early 175mm Barrels wore out VERY quickly.

Matt
210cav
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Virginia, United States
Joined: February 05, 2002
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Posted: Wednesday, October 02, 2002 - 04:28 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I read the early 175mm Barrels wore out VERY quickly.

Matt



Mattt--I am not an artillery guy by any shade of the imagination, but they used those guns way up north while I was in Vietnam along the 17th parallel. The basic problem with using them was a thing called "range probable error." This means that at a given distance so many rounds will fall over and short of the target. As I recall, range errors are given in 50 meter increments. So a range probable error 4 means 200 meters either side of the target. Now, when you factor in the error you can have anywhere from 2% to 10% of the rounds in these boxes. Normally if you are close to a target the arty boys tell you that you are in a danger close situation whcih means that a certain number of the rounds fired might hit you. Someone who is better versed may alter this, but I think I am on track here.
DJ
Ranger74
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Tennessee, United States
Joined: April 04, 2002
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Posted: Wednesday, October 02, 2002 - 04:41 AM UTC
The 8" howitzers, M110-family were our most accurate field pieces, however the MLRS has so much more capbility for teh general support role, and the M109A6 Palladin is also a much more capable system. SO the M110s were phased out. Now the M107 175mm was a "gun" and was the US Army's longest-ranged convential arty. It can really reach out and touch someone, which is why teh Israelis like it so much. As DJ stated, due to barrel length and astompherics, etc., it is a very inaccurate weapon at the longer ranges. It did have the ability during the Vietnam War to attack targets that other arty or aircraft could not reach. It was a favorite H&I weapon. Harrassment & Interdiction fires were used primarily at night on unobserved targets in an effort to harrass & interdict enemy movements. The 175mm could reach deep into enemy territory and deliver fires where friendly trrops would not be in danger. Again the MLRS is a much more accurate and deadly system.
Sabot
Joined: December 18, 2001
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Posted: Wednesday, October 02, 2002 - 11:07 AM UTC
FYI, the huge bunker-busting bombs used during the Gulf War and in Afghanistan recently were made from the gun barrels of the 8" howitzers. Cut to size, pack with explosives add a nose cone and tail fins and voilá, instant big a$$ bomb. At least they were put to good use.
kkeefe
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Massachusetts, United States
Joined: May 12, 2002
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Posted: Thursday, October 03, 2002 - 06:13 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Now the M107 175mm was a "gun" and was the US Army's longest-ranged convential arty.



I've heard too that the tube life was only about 300 rounds...??

Thanks,
Kevin Keefe
Mortars in Miniature
Arty1CD
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Oklahoma, United States
Joined: October 05, 2002
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Posted: Saturday, October 26, 2002 - 08:48 PM UTC
5th ID at FORT POLK got rid of their M-110's in 1988. They were sent to FORT STEWART 24th ID. I think that Stewart was the last units to have them.(?).
sgtreef
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Oklahoma, United States
Joined: March 01, 2002
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Posted: Sunday, October 27, 2002 - 12:31 AM UTC

Quoted Text

FYI, the huge bunker-busting bombs used during the Gulf War and in Afghanistan recently were made from the gun barrels of the 8" howitzers. Cut to size, pack with explosives add a nose cone and tail fins and voilá, instant big a$$ bomb. At least they were put to good use.



Way cool yes a good way to end a barrrels life still killing :-) :-)
shiryon
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New York, United States
Joined: April 26, 2002
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Posted: Sunday, October 27, 2002 - 03:41 AM UTC
Not being an artillery man what made the 110 so particularly accurate.wouldn't the same fire procedeures have applied to all types and tubes?

Josh
aka Shiryon