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Faun L900 and Trailer

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The FAuN (Fahrzeugfabriken Augsburg und Nürnberg) L900 was introduced into service in the German Army in the late 1930’s and intended for transportation of the light tanks in the tank battalions of the three light divisions that were under control of the Cavalry Branch. Coupled with a special-purpose trailer (Sonderanhänger 115), it could haul two light tanks at a time. Doctrinally, the transporters were to be used to take armored vehicles near the front lines, where they would unload and advance under their own power into combat. The concept was tested in Poland in 1939, with disappointing results. Subsequently, the light tank battalions formed either the nucleus of future tank regiments or were consolidated with existing ones. The transporter went on to serve throughout the war in a variety of roles requiring long-haul cargo capacity.

The vignette represents tanks from one of the light tank battalions at the Grafenwöhr Training Area, sometime in 1938. As befits any tanker who has experienced the dusty tank trails there, the vehicles have a healthy coating of “Graf dust.” The crews are seen during a break. They wear the special-purpose black uniform for armored personnel, along with the beret, which was worn until 1940. Some personnel wear overseas caps, which were still field-grey in color at this time.

There are few images of the L900 in service with the light divisions. As a result, some artistic license was applied, since it is not certain how the tanks of the light battalions were marked. In addition, I have not been able to find any references detailing how blocking, bracing and tie-down equipment was used to secured the tanks. The kit provides no instruction in this regard. The securing of the Panzerbefehlswagen I was based on an image of a Panzer I being secured to the trailer with the heavy chains used (which I fabricated out of jewelry chain).

The models used were the L900 and Sonderanhänger 115 by Das Werk Models, the Panzerbefehlswagen I by Dragon and the Panzer II, Ausführung D, by Bronco. The figures come from a variety of sources. Construction was relatively straightforward and essentially out of the box. Despite its large size, the L900 and trailer went together easily, although it would have been nicer if blocking, bracing and tie-down equipment had been provided. I am not sure if the Dragon model is completely accurate, since I was unable to find a photo of this particular bedframe antenna being mounted this way. (There are images of the bedframe image being mounted the opposite way, both in a prewar image and several images from the early campaign in the Soviet Union.)

The models were painted using primarily Vallejo, MIG and AK paints and weathering agents, with some model railroad weathering products also used. All of the motorized vehicles are painting in prewar two-tone camouflage (2/3’s Panzer grey and 1/3 dark brown). The base was formed using plaster cloth, some Vallejo ground texture and wargaming static grass and flowers.

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About the Author

About Robert Edwards (RJEdwards)
FROM: FLORIDA, UNITED STATES

US Army Reserve retired. Armor officer and FAO. Stationed in Germany with 1-35 (Erlangen) and 1-68 (Wildflecken) Armor. Taught German at USMA (West Point). Lifelong interest in armor; started building models again about two years ago after a hiatus of nearly 40 years. Primarily German WW2, with a f...


Comments

Can't make out if you are joking or not. If not then I'm guessing you are okay with a site mainly focused on modelling items used in conflict that involves death and destruction but find the natural bodily function showing as offensive. I wouldn't do a model with it included personally but find your outrage, if genuine, somewhat laughable. As regards your "Does anyone screen these images before posting them." I would imagine as it was posted by an Associate Editor on behalf of the model maker then it did indeed get screened. Great model by the way. Alan
SEP 29, 2019 - 07:21 PM
Well than! Here a difference of cultural aspects turns up between the two sides of the ocean. Why disturbing? Just look at it as a representation of real life: when the whole caravan stops, soldiers immediately unboard to 'check if they are still men'...... Part of military life. Anyone who served in field units will recognize lines of men in front of trees. Verlinden is one of the suppliers of soldiers (German ones at least) who follow the call of nature. So, most likely this model is present in many other dios. So, step over your feelings and just like the build. I am sure no bad intentions are there.
SEP 29, 2019 - 09:20 PM
Different viewpoints, different focus. No harm done. To each his own. [quote] I am sure no bad intentions are there.[quote] (p.s. Didn't even notice until you pointed it out. Too busy looking at a great dio. However I noticed the photographer right away! Nice touch.)
SEP 30, 2019 - 01:57 AM
Nice work Angel. Perfect! A guy in our neighborhood drives an old Toyota FJ that I want badly. It too has a broken rear leaf spring. I want to go up to him and fuss as it seems he is never going to repair it and will drive it "as-is" forever.
SEP 30, 2019 - 02:20 AM
There will always be the professionally offended, or professional victims, when questioning a display of anything. I suppose it's ok to be offended at a urinating solder, but perfectly ok to model a scene/diorama with the swastika flown proudly over vehicles that just went through a captured town, and the brutality that usually went with it?? Modeling is a representation of history: simple. Don't like a particular scene? Then perhaps a non-offensive hobby needs to be found. Love it or leave it (modeling), but for god sake, quit hijacking everything! My 2 cent rant...
SEP 30, 2019 - 02:38 AM
Love the build and resultant dio; ignored the other matter completely. Luckily he's not squatting in a corner...
SEP 30, 2019 - 03:02 AM
Maybe he just can't start with the other guy watching him...
SEP 30, 2019 - 05:17 AM
Maybe...
SEP 30, 2019 - 12:32 PM
Now that there is TRUCK! I really like heavy duty military trucks. And what a great way to show four models as a collective. Nice. Seth
OCT 07, 2019 - 06:43 AM
Agreed
OCT 08, 2019 - 01:57 AM