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In-Box Review
135
German SS Uniform Patches
German SS Uniform Patches
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by: Bill Cross [ BILL_C ]

introduction

The rise of the SS or Schutzstaffel (“protection battalion”) is one of the more interesting (and diabolical) stories in the whole sordid history of Nazi Germany. Originally a band of thugs and bouncers intended to protect Adolf Hitler from Communist street gangs and hecklers at Nazi rallies, it grew under Heinrich Himmler’s protection and political power to become perhaps the most-powerful force within the Third Reich. Charged with a variety of nasty tasks, including running the concentration camps, the SS established its own military wing in 1933 called the Waffen-SS. Starting out as 120 volunteers under Hitler’s former chauffeur, Josef “Sepp” Dietrich, the group eventually comprised nearly 40 divisions. The Waffen-SS had the best materiel, as well as the worst reputation for cruelty and atrocities.

Yet modeling Wehrmacht vehicles and figures without including the Waffen-SS is difficult. They often had the newest tanks and AFVs, and their distinctive uniforms and markings make them stand out from the regular Heer (army) units. Archer Fine Transfers has captured their unique look in a series of uniform patches, shoulder boards and helmet markings (reviewed here on Armorama) for 1/35th scale. This review is of the uniform patches.

What you get

In the simplest terms:

1 sheet of patches
1 sheet describing SS ranks
1 sheet of Wet Medium Paper

review

Most Waffen-SS soldiers wore collar tabs with the distinctive “runes,” along with a variety of other collar markings, including the Death’s Heads insignia. Officers wore mirrored patches with a single oak leaf, a symbol that grew out of the early paramilitary groups of the Nazi Party, but with roots in European military history.

As part of the effort to make the Waffen-SS an elite apart from the regular army, the group adopted its own peculiar rank designations. The sheet reflects that with enough patches for 20 figures, including Schütze and Oberschütze (variants on “private”), Sturmmann (PFC); Rottenführer (corporal); Unterscharführer (sergeant); Scharführer (sergeant); Oberscharführer (staff sergeant or tech sergeant); Hauptscharführer (master sergeant or sgt. major); Obersturmführer (lieutenant); Sturmbannführer (major); Standartenführer (colonel); and Oberfüher (above Standartenführer, but with no equivalent in any other army).

The set also includes the prized cuff bands of the Leibstandarte Adolf Hitler (“Life Guards of Adolf Hitler”), Wiking (the non-German division with volunteers from Scandinavia and Holland among others), Deutschland, Der Führer, Germania (one of the original regiments), Totenkopf (both camp guards and a field division) and Das Reich. These bands were more than decorative; when the Leibstandarte fought poorly near the end of the war, Sepp Dietrich made them cut off their cuff bands.

For caps, there are cap Eagles and Death’s Heads, and NCO sleeve ranks, too.

As with other Archer Fine Transfers uniform patches, these are among the best items in their catalog, both for the attention to detail and the precision of the execution. This is the kind of detailing that is simply impossible to hand paint, and the few water-slide decals out there are infuriating to apply to figures this small. I have used the Archer Wet Medium Paper on other projects, and the results are truly eye-opening: if you have never used dry transfers or have been afraid to try them, this should push you over the edge.

conclusion

Whatever your opinion of the Waffen-SS, they make up a significant portion of the wartime history of the Wehrmacht. Kit & figure manufacturers have devoted a significant number of offerings to this group, and Archer’s uniform markings are a superlative way of representing them accurately.

Our thanks to Archer Fine Transfers for providing this review sample. Please mention you saw them on Armorama when ordering.
SUMMARY
Highs: Amazing sharpness and detailing. Easier to apply than waterslide decals.
Lows: Pricy, but quality comes at a cost.
Verdict: Highest recommendation.
Percentage Rating
95%
  Scale: 1:35
  Mfg. ID: FG35042A
  Suggested Retail: $12.95
  PUBLISHED: May 05, 2011
  NATIONALITY: Germany
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 90.08%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 91.53%

Our Thanks to Archer Fine Transfers!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

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About Bill Cross (bill_c)
FROM: NEW JERSEY, UNITED STATES

Self-proclaimed rivet counter who gleefully builds tanks, planes and has three subs in the stash.

Copyright ©2019 text by Bill Cross [ BILL_C ]. All rights reserved.



Comments

Thanks for pointing that out, I have amended the review to mention the NCO sleeve ranks which are present in the set. Are these water slide decals, Brian? We normally try not to do comparisons of products in our reviews, but the Archer transfers are much more than just the item itself. Their Wet Transfer Paper is a revelation for using small things like this: Easy transfer to the object Less propensity to fold over inside-out No selvage so no silvering I don't believe we've reviewed any decals from Alliance Model Works. If you'd like to send me a set, I'll be happy to do so.
MAY 05, 2011 - 11:33 AM
   

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