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In-Box Review
135
Quad Bike Grizzly 450
Quad Bike Grizzly 450 and SMT 171B trailer
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by: Seb Viale [ SEB43 ]

Introduction

MMK is a Czech AM company dedicated on production of resin items. In the following, I will present the review of their latest product the Quad bike Grizzly 450 with the trailer SMT 171B.

Logistic has been a recurrent issue for all the armies for centuries. With the introduction of engine powered machine, animals and trailer have been slowly discarded. Nevertheless in rough terrain such as mountain range a donkey can still do the job, in order to further mechanized this branch of the logistic, recent conflicts seen the introduction of civilian small vehicles call ATV or all-terrain vehicles.

An all-terrain vehicle (ATV), also known as a quad, quad bike, three-wheeler, or four-wheeler, is defined by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) as a vehicle that travels on low-pressure tires, with a seat that is straddled by the operator, along with handlebars for steering control. As the name implies, it is designed to handle a wider variety of terrain than most other vehicles. Although it is a street-legal vehicle in some countries, it is not street legal within most states and provinces of Australia, the United States or Canada.

By the current ANSI definition, ATVs are intended for use by a single operator, although some companies have developed ATVs intended for use by the operator and one passenger. These ATVs are referred to as tandem ATVs. [1]

The rider sits on and operates these vehicles like a motorcycle, but the extra wheels give more stability at slower speeds. Although equipped with three (or typically, four) wheels, six-wheel models exist for specialized applications. Engine sizes of ATVs currently for sale in the United States (as of 2008 products), range from 49 to 1,000 cc (3- 61 cu in).

Suzuki was a leader in the development of four-wheeled ATVs. It sold the first model, the 1982 QuadRunner LT125, which was a recreational machine for beginners. Suzuki sold the first four-wheeled mini ATV, the LT50, from 1984 to 1987. After the LT50, Suzuki sold the first ATV with a CVT transmission, the LT80, from 1987 to 2006.

In 1985 Suzuki introduced to the industry the first high-performance four-wheel ATV, the Suzuki LT250R QuadRacer. This machine was in production for the 1985–1992 model years. During its production run it underwent three major engineering makeovers. However, the core features were retained. These were: a sophisticated long-travel suspension, a liquid-cooled two-stroke motor and a fully manual five-speed transmission for 1985–1986 models and a six-speed transmission for the 87–92 models. It was a machine exclusively designed for racing by highly skilled riders.

Honda responded a year later with the FourTrax TRX250R—a machine that has not been replicated until recently. It currently remains a trophy winner and competitor to big-bore ATVs. Kawasaki Heavy Industries responded with its Tecate-4 250.

In 1987, Yamaha Motor Company introduced a different type of high-performance machine, the Banshee 350, which featured a twin-cylinder liquid-cooled two-stroke motor from the RD350LC street motorcycle. Heavier and more difficult to ride in the dirt than the 250s, the Banshee became a popular machine with sand dune riders thanks to its unique power delivery. The Banshee remains popular, but 2006 is the last year it was available in the U.S. (due to EPA emissions regulations); it is still available in Canada, however.

Shortly after the introduction of the Banshee in 1987, Suzuki released the LT500R QuadRacer. This unique quad was powered by a 500 cc liquid cooled two stroke engine with a five-speed transmission. This ATV earned the nickname "Quadzilla" with its remarkable amount of speed and size. While there are claims of 100 mph stock Quadzillas, it was officially recorded by 3&4 Wheel Action magazine as reaching a top speed of over 79 mph (127 km/h) in a high speed shootout in its 1988 June issue, making it the fastest production ATV ever produced. Suzuki discontinued the production of the LT500R in 1990 after just four years.

At the same time, development of utility ATVs was rapidly escalating. The 1986 Honda FourTrax TRX350 4x4 ushered in the era of four-wheel drive ATVs. Other manufacturers quickly followed suit, and 4x4s have remained the most popular type of ATV ever since. These machines are popular with hunters, farmers, ranchers and workers at construction sites.

Safety issues with three-wheel ATVs caused all ATV manufacturers to upgrade to four-wheel models in the late 1980s, and three-wheel models ended production in 1987, due to consent decrees between the major manufacturers and the Consumer Product Safety Commission—the result of legal battles over safety issues among consumer groups, the manufacturers and CPSC. The lighter weight of the three-wheel models made them popular with some expert riders. Cornering is more challenging than with a four-wheeled machine because leaning into the turn is even more important. Operators may roll over if caution isn't used. The front end of three-wheelers obviously has a single wheel, making it lighter, and flipping backwards is a potential hazard, especially when climbing hills. Rollovers may also occur when traveling down a steep incline. The consent decrees expired in 1997, allowing manufacturers to, once again, make and market three-wheel models, though there are none marketed today. Recently the CPSC has succeeded in finally banning three-wheeled ATV's with attachments to bill HR4040. Many believe this is in response to Chinese manufacturers trying to import three-wheeled ATV's. The Japanese manufacturers were also behind this legislation, as they have been held responsible for years to provide ATV Safety training and to apply special labels and safety equipment to their ATVs while Chinese manufacturers did not.

Models continue, today, to be divided into the sport and utility markets. Sport models are generally small, light, two-wheel drive vehicles that accelerate quickly, have a manual transmission and run at speeds up to approximately 80 mph (130 km/h). Utility models are generally bigger four-wheel drive vehicles with a maximum speed of up to approximately 70 mph (110 km/h). They have the ability to haul small loads on attached racks or small dump beds. They may also tow small trailers. Due to the different weights, each has advantages on different types of terrain.

Six-wheel models often have a small dump bed, with an extra set of wheels at the back to increase the payload capacity. They can be either four-wheel drive (back wheels driving only), or six-wheel drive. (Source: Wikipedia).

Content of the kit

The kit come a small cardboard box with all the pieces safely pack in a four vacuum seal plastic bags. A small PE fret is provided. The instructions sheets are printed black on white on A4 size paper.

The casting is nicely done in grey resin with no apparent air bubbles and also no wrapping.
Around 30 pieces of resins will be used to build the Quad. PE contains 20 pieces. A copper rod is also provided.

Identification of resins pieces is easy as seen on the instruction set page 1. 20 steps are required to assemble the Quad. Please note that PE pieces are easily identified by a circle number on the instruction sets.

NOTE: This kit is not a copy of a Yamaha Grizzly 450 from a 1:32 die cast.

Assembly of the kit

Step 1 - this step covers the assembly of the front fender with the addition of the PE grill.

Step 2 - the second step is dedicated to the assembly of both gear boxes on the frame of the quad.

Step 3 and 4 - this step is critical since the suspensions are attached with very tiny resins parts like the springs and A-arms. The springs seem to be attached not directly to the body of the Quad but on small strut mount of metal not present. Be careful regarding the arms position.

Step 5 and 6 - quick step with the attachment of the front and rear fenders onto the frame.

Step 7 and 8 - this is the gluing of grills between the two fenders.

Step 9 - this step is fast since only the bottom part in PE of the main body is attached onto it.

Step 10 and 11 - those two steps cover the construction of the rear gear box onto the main frame as well as the exhaust pipe. Rods protecting the exhaust pipe are assembled, special care is required small items need to be removed from the resin films.

Step 12 - the attachment point for the trailer is constructed here with small PE pieces.

Step 13 and 14 - the rear springs with rear A-arms are constructed here, very tiny resins part required special care.

Step 15 - small details are fixed onto the main frame like the dials and the handlebar with brakes in PE

Step 16 and 17 - copper rods are attached directly to the gear box. No length is provided and the detail is pretty low at this level. It should be a drive shaft at least and not a plain simple rod.

Step 18 and 19 - all wheels are glued onto the rods as well as the A-arms. You need to drill all the wheels with 0.8 mm.

Step 20 - assembly of the front and rear racks, they are nicely done in PE. The winch hook is glue also here on the front bumper. This step concludes the build of the Quad.

Step 21 and 22 - quick and easy build of the trailer, nothing special to mention.

Conclusion

This is a nice little resin kit that fills up a big gap with this kind of vehicle. This quad is marketed as for UK service and cannot be used for US service since Polaris quads are used. Small pieces are delicate to work with (like the suspension arms and the rear box protective cage). In case of broken parts, copper wire can be used instead.

The author would like to thank MMK for providing us with the review sample.

EDITORS NOTE: A build log has been started here
SUMMARY
Highs: Nice little subject, easy to build
Lows: Some small parts to handle
Verdict: Highly recommended, a bit pricey
Percentage Rating
90%
  Scale: 1:35
  Mfg. ID: F3041
  Suggested Retail: 36 Euros
  Related Link: Manufacturers products link
  PUBLISHED: Feb 06, 2013
  NATIONALITY: United Kingdom
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 87.06%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 90.00%

About Seb Viale (seb43)
FROM: PARIS, FRANCE

Back to Europe, I am living in Paris since december 2011 with my Wife. We have a nice 6 years old daughter, and a 3 years Baby boy. I am doing AFV modern era. I started when I was a teenager , back to business after 10 years of break due to Sport (Baseball, yes european plays baseball) and Unive...

Copyright ©2019 text by Seb Viale [ SEB43 ]. All rights reserved.



Comments

I didnot find any pics with US SOF using such vehicle and Brand. They are using other type of ATV like the Polaris one. But I am sure that Frenchy will post a pics with US SOF guys with Yamaha quad just to piss me off
FEB 06, 2013 - 05:11 AM
Very nice and original kit.
FEB 06, 2013 - 05:45 AM
I'm sorry, I must be dense, but is this quad a Suzuki or a Yamaha? So far I too could only find text stating that US SOF rides on Polarises. There has been rumors that another resin kit company may make an ATV, but no solid info as to what kind and when it will be released. I'm with Mario M. on this one. I was excited about it for US SOF usage, but if it cannot be used for US SOF, then I may pass. And even then, the US SOFs use the ATV side-by-side two-seater "golf cart" at least with a roll cage--- Kawasaki Teryx 750 RUV used by the US Navy SEALs.
FEB 06, 2013 - 06:28 AM
Funny how the box art uses the same source at least as the Airfix 1/48 version due to be released later this year: Peter, the review does state that it's Yamaha.
FEB 06, 2013 - 08:54 AM
Nice thorough review with great photos, thanks!
FEB 06, 2013 - 08:56 AM
Thanks you guys for your kind word I hope to start building it asap
FEB 06, 2013 - 10:06 AM
awesome! where can i get one?
FEB 06, 2013 - 10:08 PM
I believe that this version of Quad for the British Forces was purchased in 2009 as a direct result of operations in Afghanistan. Is this correct or are they is use in other locations? I didn't read any comments in the review or the discussion about the actual deployment of the Quads so it would be interesting to hear comments about their use.
FEB 07, 2013 - 02:10 PM
I saw this model for sale at the AMPS Internationals in Atlanta recently but failed to buy one! Silly me, now is their a distributor in the US? Thanks. Keith.
MAY 18, 2013 - 12:39 AM
   

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