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Conversions and Scratch Builds
165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 - 05:08 PM UTC
Robert - Your mobile V2 launch/command center is looking very impressive! Your folders and binders on the interior are giving me ideas for my Radio Bus. I already made some bound books for the KOM but did not think of 3-ring binders!

Angel and Robert - thank you for the info on the generators. Did not know about the Riich models offering - very interesting! I have a small generator - the Zundap, I think - by Plus Models but right now I cannot find it in my stash to offer a photo. I did however, know about the smaller trailer mounted generator by Lead Warrior.

Angel - using DC for the bread dough kneader makes sense given the higher torque of the DC motors and their ability for a stronger start under heavy load. Do not think they/we had the ability (not totally sure) to "rectify" AC into DC back then. Our local water pumping station has an old preserved triple expansion steam engine from the mid-mid-thirities and off to one side they also had need to create DC voltage to run certain controls. They literally had an AC motor turning a DC generator to provide the DC for the pumping plant. Of course you could easily build a generator that had both AC and DC windings.

I guess am most interested in learning just what generators would be required to power what facilities? Search lights, fire control directors, radios, battery chargers, etc. When would the larger generator trailers be required? When would the smaller 2- and 4-man carry generators be adiquate?
165thspc
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Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 - 05:14 PM UTC
A fellow modeler Monte Kelch in the Cincinnati area scratch built the V2 command center and launch table/trailer some years back. He did not however attempt an interior with his. I would like to share a photo of his work here.

165thspc
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Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 - 06:56 PM UTC
A couple more pics as I develop the detailing on the "Radio Bus":



ayovtshev
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Sofiya, Bulgaria
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Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 - 07:09 PM UTC
Mike,
Good to see your modelling juices are back!

165thspc
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Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 - 07:11 PM UTC
A minor criticism of the Roden bus: -- No steering linkage of any kind??? Easily added but I have never seen a model truck in 1/35th that had NOTHING.

165thspc
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Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 - 07:21 PM UTC
Yes Angel, they're back, no match for your's but they are back!
SpeedyJ
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Bangkok, Thailand / ไทย
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Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 - 07:36 PM UTC
Michael you got me obsessed. I'm from the Netherlands, so I started to search for well known brands producing equipment related to power supplies etc.
I did Heemaf Hengelo (telephone and wiring) Stork Hengelo, like AEG producing power plants and all sorts of equipment.
Example AEG means Algemeine Eletricitāts Gemeinschaft. No production other than MG's. Most of the production came from them.
Mannesmann, nothing. Siemens & Siemens Schuckert nothing.
I will look in the history files of some companies. Think it is rather simple realising pre war small and middle class businesses had to listen to the war department. Philips Eindhoven I did not check yet. Also the opposite borders of what was called Sudetenland had very big and high tech industry Tatra, Skoda. Big knowledge and resources. Going to look for some folders and catalogue's. My father had some great stuff with old names in it(I have them in Thailand)
Germany had some friends you know... Americans were not very popular where I was born.


Digging...

Kind regards,

Robert Jan
ayovtshev
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Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 - 07:37 PM UTC
I have a soft spot for communication vehicles.
I served half of my time in the army 25 years ago as radioman and switchboard operator.My switchboard was old German one-we used to call it "The Bedbug".
Whenever I see a field phone, or old switchboard my fingers reach automaticaly to the camera-oops, the cellphone.
Here is an example-German field phone mod.1943:


I convinced a fellow modeller to combine forces for modelling a German communications truck-either Fernsprechbetriebswagen, or Funkbetriebskraftwagen-where I will take care of the interior.
Hope we will start before year's end.

165thspc
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Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 - 07:50 PM UTC
Robert & Angel I can relate - I have twenty years working for the American Manufacture Square D Company now wholly owned by Groupe Schneider in France. Whenever I see electrical distribution equipment I have to "check it out"!

Angel - I have often seen these German Field Phones but in a brownish-red-black Bakelite case which is why I went for a brown color with the one in my field command bus.
ayovtshev
#490
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Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 - 07:55 PM UTC
Robert,
Siemens Schuckert Werke(SSW) had a lot to do with power production and power transmission equipment.
The DC generator I am about to start building soon had a SSW dynamo installed.
SSW delivered all the equipment for the big Soviet water powerplants built in the late 1920's-early 1930's.
And here is another SSW installation- a bit off topic, but- built back in 1912, installed in 1914 and still producing electricity as of today(Pallace of Carska Bistrica/Borovetz area/Bulgaria):


165thspc
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Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 - 08:01 PM UTC
Gentlemen if all this is off-topic then it is a direction/topic I like going in!

I love old generator and pumping equipment especially if it is still being used for its' original purpose and not just a museum piece!
SpeedyJ
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Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 - 08:23 PM UTC
Blast! Angel you used the SSW Acronym. Should have known that. It was a big name by that time. Great stuff we're digging(off topic fun)!!!
165thspc
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Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 - 08:27 PM UTC
If you are building an electric generator then here is a reference photo you may enjoy:

ayovtshev
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Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 - 08:59 PM UTC
Gentlemen,
Besides SSW there is also Telefunken.
Marketing materials from 1940-some generators are present:

165thspc
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Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 12:49 AM UTC
This photo just posted on Facebook TODAY! This generator was to run a 16mm movie projector for a PK unit showing something to a unit in the field.


I think the pipe in this case is just to muffle the exhaust a bit more.
165thspc
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Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 01:21 AM UTC
I know radios take only a small bit of power to receive but I also know from experience, when you hit the "send" button the guy turning the generator cranks work load goes WAY up! A WWII AM ship-to-shore radio like the BC-645 took something like 400 amps to broadcast. I am thinking it would require at least the medium sized, 15 kVA trailer mounted generator to run a command post such as this.

I would also think it would take at least that much juice to run a AAA search light unit. Back then they were using carbon arc light which is nothing more than an arc welder sustaining a controlled constant arc. Now something like that would require A LOT of amps! (Probably another time when a DC generator would be required.)


Everything you see in the photo has now been permanently attached except the crates on the roof. Still working on that second radio but that operator fellow is none the less pounding away on that code key! Still need to add papers strune about.
ayovtshev
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Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 02:06 AM UTC
Speaking about Propaganda Kompanie, this is the equipment of Bulgarian First Army's PK in spring 1945:


;)

2 more generators used in Royal Bulgarian Army/Air Force:
4 man generator, feeding Lorenz transmiter on MB L2000 chassy,Bulgarian AF,1938

Clearly visible are the storage compartment for the generator and the ramp for sliding it to the ground.

Anti-aircraft battery participating the St.George's Day Parade(May 6th 1940) in Sofia:

Einheitsdiesel are towing 150 cm. Scheinwerfer 34 on Sd.Ah.104 and the generator for the searchlight- Maschinensatz 110V,24 kW on Sd.Ah. 104.
A Ringtrichter-Richtungshoerer(RRH) is visible in the lower right corner of the picture.It is also mounted on Sd.Ah.104

165thspc
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Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 02:41 AM UTC
Very nice!
165thspc
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Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 02:47 AM UTC
More found photos - Used here for discussion only.

Some sort of Bus (not Ludwig) towing 15 kVA generator trailer:


A Blitz bus with some sort of signals trailer - not a generator - (could be the small Telemeter 35 of an artillery unit):


And my latest find - The interior of a command bus:
ayovtshev
#490
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Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 09:33 PM UTC
I've finished my Teigknetanhänger(1 achs.)/Sd.Ah.35:




The sight of this couple must have cheered every soldier's heart:

165thspc
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Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 09:54 PM UTC
That pair could turn out 30+ loaves of bread every 90 minutes. Fantastic work Angel.

For some reason I keep thinking about getting assigned KP duty and having to clean the dough machine every night!
ayovtshev
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Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 03:29 PM UTC
Mike,

I think you would feel much better if you are assigned to "clean" the bread oven instead.

I started reworking my Blitz KOM and went back through the pictures you posted.Very usefull!

I think the "Wassen stompers"( quote:"And what I have heard at times called "duck boards".... I am sure the Germans have some long combined name for them translating to something like "wooden structure to prevent slipping on wet floors"."Wassen stompers"- end of quote) in German might be something like: Nassflurabrutschvorbeugebretter.

SpeedyJ
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Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 04:37 PM UTC
Hi Angel. Love the Teigknetenanhänger! Outstanding work! German is the most complicated language. Used to speak it fluently but one has to be around. I'm drilling lots of holes to fix my first Friul tracks for the 'Feuerleitpanzer'. Your painting is very natural, good weathering!
More to come from my builds coming weekend, at least some progress.

Kind regards,

Robert Jan
ayovtshev
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Sofiya, Bulgaria
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Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 06:17 PM UTC
Thanks Robert.
The Feuerleitpanzer body with all these angled plates will be quite a challenge.
Bevelling the plates to form the right angles- another big challenge.
Still I would preffer such challenges before drilling out Fruil holes- the most tedious job I've done in modelling(T-34/76 tracks- 3 hours...,T-14 Armata tracks- 8 hours...Even nice music not helping out...),that's why my Fruil stash is collecting dust for almost an year.
Looking forward to see your progress!
SpeedyJ
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Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 06:35 PM UTC
Hi.Talking about modelling in very hot, humid conditions, I plan all my painting for the winter that will come. 20 degrees celsius in Thailand. Progress is therefore slow now. It is just awful hot these days.

Kind regards,

Robert Jan