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wire mesh size
mogdude
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Posted: Saturday, March 02, 2019 - 02:40 AM UTC
anyone have an idea what the best mesh/micron size etc would be good to use for the M113 grills on the hull top other then the ones available in dedicated pe sets as I wont be using the rest of the sets I have seen some sheets of material on line from differnt sources but not sure which one would be the best size since its hard to get an accurate view of them (and some are quite pricey)so want to get a good fit as I am building several M113s
TIA
RLlockie
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Posted: Saturday, March 02, 2019 - 03:51 AM UTC
I canít give you a direct answer having not measured one as far as I recall but I can give you a method which I used successfully on the T-34.

Find a clear photo showing the whole grille and count the number of rows either from front to back of side to side. I think the M113 mesh is square. Then measure on your model the size of the grille. Divide that distance by the number of rows and you have the mesh size required.
mogdude
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Posted: Saturday, March 02, 2019 - 05:57 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I canít give you a direct answer having not measured one as far as I recall but I can give you a method which I used successfully on the T-34.

Find a clear photo showing the whole grille and count the number of rows either from front to back of side to side. I think the M113 mesh is square. Then measure on your model the size of the grille. Divide that distance by the number of rows and you have the mesh size required.



I shall give that aa try
Thanks
RobinNilsson
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Posted: Saturday, March 02, 2019 - 06:14 AM UTC
http://data3.primeportal.net/apc/cesar_ferreira/m113/images/m113_07_of_37.jpg

http://data4.primeportal.net/apc/jeff_derosa/m113/images/m113_31_of_96.jpg

http://data4.primeportal.net/apc/jeff_derosa/m113/images/m113_64_of_96.jpg

http://data4.primeportal.net/apc/jeff_derosa/m113/images/m113_62_of_96.jpg

http://data4.primeportal.net/apc/jeff_derosa/m113/images/m113_80_of_96.jpg

http://data3.primeportal.net/apc/dan_hay/m113a2/images/m113a2_066_of_132.jpg
mogdude
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Posted: Saturday, March 02, 2019 - 06:21 AM UTC
thanks for the photos
RobinNilsson
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Posted: Saturday, March 02, 2019 - 10:43 AM UTC
When looking for mesh.
Check out art&craft stores and sewing suppplies.
Ribbons for present wrapping and for tying flower arrangements are sometimes made of fine mesh.

Stiffening the mesh so that it does not fall apart when being cut to shape.
1. Set up a card board splash surface/shield
2. Place a drop of CA on a hard surface, piece of metal/glass/plastic
3. Take a deep breath
4. Soak parts of the mesh in the CA drop
5. Hold the soaked mesh in front of the splash board and blow air through it.
6. Now you know why you need a splash board

The air will blow the surplus CA from the mesh to the splash board. Only a little will remain in where the wires/threads cross. The moisture in your breath will speed up the curing of the CA.
Repeat from point 3 until you have worked through a piece of mesh which is big enough. The area that gets soaked in one go depends on the size of the CA drop. A huge drop that could soak the needed area of mesh in one go will be wasting CA ...

The CA reinforced mesh will hold together guite well but it can't take just any level of abuse so some care is needed when cutting. Sharp scissors will work if you are careful but pressing down with a steel ruler and cutting a few strands at the time with a rounded knife blade (nr 10 or nr 5 scalpel blade) is probably better.

Thank PrimePortal for the images
/ Robin

Edit: Thanks to Matt for providing the correct name for the material. I bought a very cheap set of cheesy black tulle curtains some years ago. That one was a very fine mesh, suitable for the finer mesh in one of those M113 images linked in my previous post.
Now I have mesh to last me a couple of lifetimes but the whole thing, about 6 square yards, only cost 3 to 4 times as much as the small sheets sold in hobby stores.
matt
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Posted: Saturday, March 02, 2019 - 10:29 PM UTC
Head to the craft/fabric store.... look for Tulle. the stuff most wedding veils is made from. the mesh comes in various sizes.

As Robin mentions, it can be found in Ribbon form as well.