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Gato-class submarine, USS Cod

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"Bill Cross (bill_c), Armorama Associate Editor took a recent trip to Cleveland, Ohio, and stopped by the USS COD Submarine Memorial, and snapped a batch of "walk-around" images for us to enjoy!

USS Cod
The USS Cod is a Gato-class submarine currently residing in Lake Erie off Cleveland's Lakeshore Drive. During a recent visit to Cleveland to see the Rock ‘N Roll Hall of Fame (just about a hundred yards away), I had the opportunity to photograph the outside of the Cod.

Gato-class subs were a potent force against Japanese shipping during WW II and were so effective, the Japanese used to say you could walk from Singapore to Tokyo stepping on all the American submarines. Gato-class submarines were gradually improved during the war with refits, and were joined by the similar-looking Balao-glass boats that had a stronger hull and could dive deeper.

The Cod was commissioned in June, 1943 and made seven war patrols in the Pacific. All seven war patrols were judged to be “successful,” and the boat received seven battle stars in commemoration. She sank ten ships with torpedoes and damaged another five, while sinking an additional five ships, 24 junks and 11 floating mines by gunfire. She frequently served "lifeguard" duty picking up downed US fliers, and ended up rescuing the crew of the O-19, a Dutch submarine that ran aground on Ladd Reef in the South China Sea. After the war, the Cod was decommissioned and placed in mothballs in June, 1946.

In 1951, the Cod was re-commissioned as part of NATO anti-submarine exercises. She was decommissioned again in 1954 and placed in the reserve fleet. In 1959, the Cod was towed to Cleveland to serve as a training ship until finally stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in 1971. A group of local vets and citizens saved the Cod from the scrap heap by turning her into a floating museum in 1976, and in recognition of the Cod’s valuable service, the U.S. Department of the Interior designated Cod a National Historic Landmark in 1986.

Unlike with other submarine museum ships, no stairs have been cut into the Cod’s pressure hull, so visitors must enter and exit via the ladders once used by the crew. The Cod is in excellent condition, and I hope these photos will assist modelers and encourage them to visit, too. The museum includes one of the Cod's massive bronze propellers, a working periscope and a Hansen torpedo loading cart and torpedo. The museum is open from May 1st to September 30th.
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About the Author

About Bill Cross (bill_c)
FROM: NEW JERSEY, UNITED STATES

Self-proclaimed rivet counter who gleefully builds tanks, planes and has three subs in the stash.


Comments

Thanks, Gunny! I recommend this to all in the Cleveland area or who are passing through. There are so few historic vessels like this so well-preserved.
JUL 26, 2010 - 02:28 AM
I just saw this one, great Walk around, thanks for the pics!
SEP 08, 2010 - 12:57 AM
Glad you enjoyed it!
SEP 08, 2010 - 05:14 AM